Tuesday, June 29, 2010

Bob Ostrom - Cartoonist Survey #137



Bob Ostrom has been a professional illustrator for over 20 years. He finished his studies in illustration and advertising at the New England School of Design in 1985 and started his career as an assistant art director. Since then his art has been featured in over 200 children's books and publications and he has designed logos, toys and games. The list of companies he has done work for, such as Disney, Parker Brothers, Scholastic, Hooked on Phonics, Cartoon Network and Nickelodeon shows that his specialty is children’s art. Bob lives in North Carolina and is represented by Deborah Wolfe LTD . He has a great website which features a How-2-Draw page filled with tutorials and other resources. You can learn even more about Bob by checking out his blog. There is very good series of Bob’s “How to Draw” DVDs that are available here at Jerry's Artarama.

In addition to his illustration work he also co-created and co-hosts the podcasts on the Creative Independence Network with multimedia designer, Chris Wilson. The Creative Independence Network uses a variety of online media including podcasts, blogs and social media sites to help “independent creatives look at their current roles and see possibilities beyond what they are doing now.” Find out more about
Creative Independence here.

What is your favorite pen to use?
I'm not too fussy about pens. Lately I've been into using a brush pen for some of my line work. Faber Castel makes a good one so does Prisma Color. I like the looseness and fluctuation in line weight.

Do you draw in pencil first and if so do you use a standard pencil or a mechanical one?
I always sketch out my drawings out in red pencil. I start really loose with a .5 and then tighten up with a 2mm. After that I go over it with a 2b. Seems like a lot work but it actually saves me a ton of time when I bring the whole mess into Photoshop and drop out the reds. I prefer mechanical pencils. I love em. I must have at least 50 different kinds. There's nothing worse to me than a dull, nubby, wooden pencil.

Do you do your coloring by hand or on the computer?
I do all my color digitally. It's just the fastest most efficient way for me to get thing done.

If you do your coloring by hand, what do you use?
Watercolor mostly. It's really hard to duplicate that kind of spontaneity on a computer.

What type of paper do you use?
Cheap copy paper. I go through a lot of paper when I sketch and since I do my color on the computer that's what works best for me. I shudder to think what I'd be spending if I sketched everything out on the high quality stuff. On the other hand when I do need good paper I don't skimp. Bienfang and Strathmore are my favorites.

What thing(s) do you hate to draw?
Anything riding a bike (I can never get the pedals right). Merry-go-rounds give me headaches and so do soccer balls. When I'm in charge all those little shapes on the ball will be changed to squares and artists everywhere will rejoice.

Do you buy your supplies from big chain art store catalogues/websites or a local one that you physically go to?
I get all my art supplies from Jerry's Artarama here in Raleigh. They have a great store. What I don't get there comes from my local office supply chain. I really hate waiting for stuff so shopping on-line can be a drag. Plus I love the smell of a big old art store....can't get that on line.

Are there any rituals that you do before starting to draw?
Nope, no time for pre-game warm ups. I usually just dive right in. When I get keyed up though I love to run or go to the gym. Helps clear my head.

Do you listen to music while you draw and if so what genre?
Sometimes I'll listen to music but mostly I'm a big podcast fan . When I'm working late a good audio book is a nice distraction.

Did you read comics as a kid and if so what was your favorite?
Peanuts, I learned to draw by tracing Charlie Brown. I also loved Mad magazine, Sergio Aragones was the best.

What is or was your favorite comic strip?
It's hard to pin it down to just one strip. There are so many I love. The first place I go when I read any paper is the comics section. If your paper doesn't have comics... sorry I'm not interested.

What was your favorite book as a child and do you still own a copy of it?
I had this old paperback Peanuts book I found in the attic. I forget the name... might have been You're a Good Man Charlie Brown or something like that. I read that thing over and over again. I studied the art on each page until the spine finally broke and all the pages fell out.

Did you have any formal art training and if so where did you receive it?
I went to the New England School of Art and Design in Boston. It's now a part of Suffolk Universtiy.

Do you feel that the Internet is a blessing or a curse?
Blessing. It's really hard to remember what life was like without it. Finding reference used to be such a chore. I knew these guys who used to have giant file cabinets filled with reference photos clipped from magazines and such. Interacting with people was more face to face... I miss that a little but the idea that you can answer almost any question that pops into your brain in seconds still amazing to me.

Did either of your parents draw?
No but my mother always did a lot of crafts.

Who in your life is/was the most supportive of your art?
It's been many different people at different times in my life. My family has always been there for me and that means a lot. I feel it's really important to surround yourself with people who believe in what you do.

Do you keep a sketchbook?
I carry a sketchbook with me where ever I go. I have about 10 different sketchbooks going right now and a bunch sitting in my attic. Every once and a while I dig them out and ransack them for ideas.

Have you ever taught cartooning/drawing and if so did you enjoy the experience?
I teach cartooning classes to kids at Jerry's Artarama in Raleigh. I've also done a couple of DVD's on cartooning. It's the best gig in the world.

Do you feel that talent or passion is more important in drawing?
It's both. One usually feeds the other but I tend to lean more toward passion. All the talent in the world will go nowhere without the passion to drive it forward.

Do you collect anything and if so what?
Junk mostly. Man, you should see my desk...

If you were an animated cartoon character who do you think you would be?
Eek the cat.

Are you a righty or lefty?
Lefty sort of. I write and draw with my left hand but that's it. For everything else I'm a righty.


If you weren't an artist what would you want to do for work?
I'd love to be a professional musician. How cool would that be?

In one or two sentences describe your drawing area.
Messy and cluttered. Everything I need is within arm’s reach (I can never find anything when it's tidy).

Do you play any musical instruments?
I'm a drummer. I used to play with a band called the Funk Assassins. That was a blast.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone who wants to pursue drawing as a career what would it be?
Surround yourself with people who encourage you to live your dream the rest will take care of itself.

Who is your favorite artist?
My daughter Mae. Do I have to pick one because my son Charlie is a rockin' good artist too.

Thanks very much Bob.

Howard Tayler, creator, author and artist for the webcomic “Schlock Mercenary” is up next.

Sunday, June 27, 2010

2010 Bunny Bash

A couple of weeks ago, Ed Steckley (Cartoonist Survey #108) invited me to attend Bunny Hoest’s “Bunny Bash” on Long Island. The Bunny Bash is a get together of cartoonists and their friends and family which is held annually in June at the house of Bunny Hoest, the writer of the cartoons The Lockhorns, Laugh Parade and Howard Huge.

The Bash started many years ago when Bill Hoest, creator of the Lockhorns comic panel, wanted to show his cartoonist buddies the house he had designed and was in the process of building. He invited over members of the Long Island chapter of the National Cartoonists Society (a.k.a. “Berndt Toast Gang” named in honor of Walter Berndt, the cartoonist of “Smitty”) for lunch and a tour of the construction. After Bill passed away in 1988 his wife Bunny continued to host this annual gathering.

My wife Patti and I made the trip down last week. It was quite a long trip, but well worth it. Bunny’s home, the grounds and the ocean made an amazing backdrop for the event. Everyone was very welcoming to us newcomers. When we first arrived the skies were looking ominous, but after a very brief shower and wind storm, the sun broke through the clouds and conversations carried on, never missing a beat. We found out later that this storm produced a tornado which touched down in Bridgeport, CT creating all kinds of damage and sending 25 people to the hospital.

This is a picture taken from the back of the house. The house is constructed of old cobblestones that used to pave the New York City streets. Some of them still have the actual tar on them. The place is right on the water and is simply beautiful.


Above is a photo of me and cartoonist Mike Lynch who drove down from New Hampshire. Mike was the first person we met at the party and he had us laughing from the very start of the conversation.

We then met Ray Alma (Cartoonist Survey #124) and his wife Caryn who couldn’t have been more friendly to us. Ed Steckley (Cartoonist Survey #108) and his wife Heather showed up a little bit later and upon arrival Ed took Patti and I on a quick tour of the studio. On the way up to the studio, I took the above picture of legendary MAD magazine cartoonist and caricaturist Mort Drucker relaxing on the couch.

Here is Ed looking pensive while sitting at the drawing board. Note the original Lockhorns panels on the left hand wall.


Here I am sitting at the same drawing board.

It was such a treat to meet Mort Drucker, who was nice enough to pose with me.

I also had the honor to speak with long time New Yorker magazine cartoonist George Booth.

Here is a photo of me and Bunny. She was such a gracious hostess and a delightful woman.

Patti and I had such a good time. We want to thank everyone for being so nice to us, especially Ed and Heather Steckley, Ray and Caryn Alma, Mike Lynch and of course Bunny Hoest!

Friday, June 25, 2010

Kevin Kallaugher - Cartoonist Survey #136




Kevin Kallaugher, known as KAL, is a political cartoonist and animator who was born in Norwalk, CT in 1955. He graduated from Harvard College with a degree in Visual and Environmental Studies in 1977. Kevin went to the British Isles after college and was hired by The Economist to become their first resident cartoonist in March of 1978. Working in London for the next 10 years he continued as the cartoonist for the Economist, as well as many other publications including The Sunday Telegraph, The Observer, Today and The Mail on Sunday. Kevin returned to the US in 1988 and became the editorial cartoonist for the Baltimore Sun. During his 17 years drawing for the Sun he drew over 4000 cartoons while continuing to draw two cartoons per week for The Economist. His work has appeared in well over 100 publications worldwide such as Der Spiegel, Daily Yomiuri, The Australian, Pravda, Le Monde, The New York Times, The Washington Post and Newsweek.

In 2006, Kevin’s work was exhibited at The Walter’s Art Gallery and has also been on display at the Library of Congress in Washington and at the Tate Gallery in London. He has been presented with many awards for his work including multiple Thomas Nast Awards, The Gillray Goblet, The Grafica Internazionale Award and The Berryman Award. Over the years Kevin has also been involved in animation and in 2007 he launched the Maryland based animation company, Kaltoons, which produces both 2-D and 3-D animations. Visit Kevin’s website and check out his sketchblog. If you have an iPhone, you may purchase his app, iKal Book for $0.99 from the App Store on iPhone and iPod Touch.

What is your favorite pen to use?
A quill pen with a special nib: George W Hughes 1319.

Do you draw in pencil first and if so do you use a standard pencil or a mechanical one?
I draw in pencil using a mechanical pencil .5 HB.

Do you do your coloring by hand or on the computer?
By hand.

If you do your coloring by hand, what do you use?
Normally watercolor and gouache.

What type of paper do you use?
Pen and ink: smooth Bristol, Color: Arches hot pressed watercolor block.

What thing(s) do you hate to draw?
Cars.

Do you buy your supplies from big chain art store catalogues/websites or a local one that you physically go to?

Both.

Are there any rituals that you do before starting to draw?
No.

Do you listen to music while you draw and if so what genre?
Yes... Mostly blues . Now increasingly I listen to podcasts from the BBC and web based TV episodes.

Did you read comics as a kid and if so what was your favorite?
Occasionally.

What is or was your favorite comic strip?
Calvin and Hobbes.

What was your favorite book as a child and do you still own a copy of it?
Dr Seuss: ‘If I Ran the Zoo’... Yes.

Did you have any formal art training and if so where did you receive it?
Bachelors degree from Harvard in Visual and Environmental Studies.

Do you feel that the Internet is a blessing or a curse?
A complete blessing... Easy access to reference images, view the great work of colleagues around the world, share your work with new audiences.

Did either of your parents draw?
Both painted.

Who in your life is/was the most supportive of your art?
Early on my Harvard teacher Albert Alcalay.

Do you keep a sketchbook?
Yes.

Have you ever taught cartooning/drawing and if so did you enjoy the experience?
No.

Do you feel that talent or passion is more important in drawing?
Both are required for excellence.

Do you collect anything and if so what?
Men's waistcoats.

If you were an animated cartoon character who do you think you would be?
Yosemite Sam.

Are you a righty or lefty?
Righty.

If you weren't an artist what would you want to do for work?
Blues Saxophonist.

In one or two sentences describe your drawing area.
Cluttered, doing 3 jobs at the same time.

Do you play any musical instruments?
No.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone who wants to pursue drawing as a career what would it be?

Love what you are doing. If you do not make a living as an artist you can still enjoy drawing as a lifetime passion.

Who is your favorite artist?
Daumier.

Thanks again Kevin.

Up next is illustrator Bob Ostrom.

Monday, June 21, 2010

Nate Beeler - Cartoonist Survey #135



Award-winning editorial cartoonist for the Washington Examiner, Nate Beeler began his cartooning career drawing for his high school’s student newspaper in Columbus, OH. He graduated from American University with a journalism degree in 2002. While in college Nate won the three major college cartooning awards: first place in the SPJ Mark of Excellence Awards, the Charles M. Schulz Award, and the John Locher Award. Since becoming the editorial cartoonist for the Washington Examiner in 2005 his cartoons have also appeared on CNN and in such publications as Newsweek, Time, USA Today and the Los Angeles Times. He is one of the most widely syndicated editorial cartoonists, with his cartoons distributed internationally to more than 800 publications by Cagle Cartoons. In 2007, Nate won the Golden Spike Award, which was voted upon by members of the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists at its 50th anniversary convention in Washington. One year later the National Press Foundation awarded him the prestigious Clifford K. & James T. Berryman Award. Just few months ago he took home this year’s The Thomas Nast Award. See more of Nate’s work here at the Washington Examiner and for all of your political and editorial cartoon needs go to Daryl Cagle's great website.

What is your favorite pen to use?
I mostly use a #3 Winsor Newton Series 7 brush, but I rely on the Micron pens (Nos. 1, 5 and 8) for teeny details and lettering. Every once in a while I use dip pen nibs to keep things interesting.

Do you draw in pencil first and if so do you use a standard pencil or a mechanical one?
Before I ever put ink to paper, I'll usually completely pencil in and erase the cartoon multiple times before I feel comfortable moving forward. For whatever reason, I absolutely have to have a sharp pencil point, so I use mechanical pencils.

Do you do your coloring by hand or on the computer?
Computer.

What type of paper do you use?
Standard smooth bristol board.

What thing(s) do you hate to draw?
Buildings, cars, animals, perfect circles, Mitt Romney.

Do you buy your supplies from big chain art store catalogues/websites or a local one that you physically go to?
Both. The local store doesn't carry the ink I like to use, Dr. Ph. Martin's.

Are there any rituals that you do before starting to draw?
Besides slaughtering a ram, I compulsively pace around the office or the sidewalk (on nice days) and recheck the news online.

Do you listen to music while you draw and if so what genre?
"I'm Henry the Eighth, I Am," over and over again in my head. That is, until "Livin' La Vida Loca" takes over.

Did you read comics as a kid and if so what was your favorite?
Most definitely. I was a huge Wolverine fan, as drawn by Marc Silvestri and Mark Texeira. Soon after I started reading, Image Comics started up, and like a good fanboy, I collected and read every title. Cyberforce, Spawn, Savage Dragon.

What is or was your favorite comic strip?
My favorite has got to be Calving and Hobbes, though I also loved Bloom County and Outland, the Far Side and Foxtrot. My favorites now are Cul de Sac and Pearls Before Swine.

What was your favorite book as a child and do you still own a copy of it?
Hmmm... Probably "If I Ran the Circus," by Dr. Seuss. Later on, the Lord of the Rings trilogy. And yes, I still have them.

Did you have any formal art training and if so where did you receive it?
I took art classes in high school on top of Saturday morning classes at the Columbus College of Art and Design. In college I signed up for several life-drawing classes as electives. I graduated with a degree in journalism.

Do you feel that the Internet is a blessing or a curse?
Blessing, no doubt about it.

Did either of your parents draw?
Not that I know of.

Who in your life is/was the most supportive of your art?
My parents.

Do you keep a sketchbook?
Yes, though it tends to spend most of its time at my office.

Have you ever taught cartooning/drawing and if so did you enjoy the experience?
No, but I'm sure it would be enjoyable to have the chance.

Do you feel that talent or passion is more important in drawing?
Passion. Without it, you can't develop talent.

Do you collect anything and if so what?
I used to collect comic books, cartooning books and music, but there's not as much time for that nowadays. Also, I'd need to ramp up my other hobby of collecting money. I'm not great at that one.

If you were an animated cartoon character who do you think you would be?
Jessica Rabbit. Wait a sec... Wrong question.

Are you a righty or lefty?
I'm closer to the middle. I'd use my right hand to point out where that is.

If you weren't an artist what would you want to do for work?
I would want to be a roller coaster ride tester. Or maybe a food critic.

In one or two sentences describe your drawing area.
It's pretty messy. My drawing board has a swivel light that I never use. I've got used-up pens and old sketches everywhere. Woops, that was three sentences! Oh no, that's four!

Do you play any musical instruments?
Yes, guitar.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone who wants to pursue drawing as a career what would it be?
Figure out what you want and then work hard to get it.

Who is your favorite artist?
My favorites include Pat Oliphant, Jim Borgman, Jeff Macnelly, Matt Davies, Mike Ramirez, Nick Anderson, Scott Stantis, Tom Toles, Richard Thompson, Cam Cardow and Mike Lester, among others.



Thanks a lot Nate!

Political cartoonist and animator Kevin Kallaugher shares his answers next.

Saturday, June 19, 2010

The Barker Character, Comic and Cartoon Museum

The wife and I just came back from a mid-week vacation where we revisited a fascinating place that we stumbled across a few years back. The Barker Character, Comic and Cartoon Museum located in Cheshire, CT is the country’s largest collection of comic strip, cartoon, TV, western and advertising collectibles. Their exhibits span fourteen decades from the 1870s to present day. The Museum is the personal collection of Herb and Gloria Barker. Herb was an avid collector of memorabilia but when his hobby outgrew their home, Gloria expressed her “desire” for him to find a new venue for his vast collection. In 1997 the Museum celebrated its grand opening and to this day continues to add great finds to the expansive display, never ceasing to evoke fond childhood memories for all ages.

Located adjacent to the Museum is one of the most renowned animation art galleries in the world, The Barker Animation, Fine Art & Sculptures Gallery. They feature America’s premier artists, working in a variety of genres which include classical, contemporary, whimsical and traditional. Some of the amazing pieces for sale included signed artwork from Chuck Jones, Iwao Takamoto and Bill Melendez…just to name a few.

Upon entering the Museum, we were greeted by our official tour guide, Jay Zabel. Unfortunately, we were also greeted by a large sign indicating “no photos allowed,” thus my hopes of being able to share this gem with readers at David-Wasting-Paper were dashed. Jay noticed our disappointment and suggested we seek special permission from the Gallery. I explained to Gallery Director, Allison Simcik, that my intention with the photos was to introduce the Museum and Gallery to my readership. She placed a phone call and upon verification of the nature of my blog, we were granted one-time approval to document our visit. Thank you!

Here is Jay standing in front of some very old Disney memorabilia.

Jay was not only knowledgeable about the thousands of items and their history, but he himself shared in our excitement and enthusiasm as we discovered lost childhood treasures throughout the tour. If you are ever in the Connecticut area, it is a must see for any comic or cartoon enthusiast…and tell them David-Wasting-Paper sent you!

Now on with the tour…be sure to click on the photos to view in greater detail...this is only a VERY small sample of what is at The Barker Character, Comic and Cartoon Museum.

Yellow Kid cigarette promotional buttons.

Early Felix the Cat and Moon Mullins.

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

Fontaine Fox's "Toonerville Folks"

Daily Dime banks.

One of the many display cases of Popeye.

Little Lulu

They have whole walls of these "Frame-Tray" puzzles. I had this Secret Squirrel one when I was a kid.

Boy I sure wish I owned these "TV-TINYKINS" put out by Marx.

This is a great mural on one of the buildings on the grounds.

A close-up of a section of the mural.

I'd like to take a minute and thank my wife Patti, who was not only nice enough to go with me, but who also took all of the photographs.

Tuesday, June 15, 2010

Who In Your Life Is/Was The Most Supportive Of Your Art? - Cartoonist Survey Answers Compiled

In honor of today's compiled answers to the question, "Who In Your Life Is/Was The Most Supportive Of Your Art?" I thought I would share some pertinent quotes that I like...

"Risk more than others think is safe. Care more than others think is wise. Dream more than others think is practical. Expect more than others think is possible. " - Cadet Maxim

"Never let the odds keep you from doing what you know in your heart you were meant to do." - H. Jackson Brown, Jr.

"Trust your own instinct. Your mistakes might as well be your own, instead of someone else's." - Billy Wilder

"Never give up on what you really want to do. The person with big dreams is more powerful than one with all the facts." - Unknown

"Kind words can be short and easy to speak, but their echoes are truly endless." - Mother Theresa

And now here are the compiled answers to the question, Who In Your Life Is/Was The Most Supportive Of Your Art?

The results are based on the answers provided by the first 100 cartoonists/artists.

Spouse - 25
Parents - 14
Everyone - 11
Mom - 9
Family - 8
Myself - 6
Brother - 2
Colleagues - 2
Dad - 2
Didn't provide an answer - 2
Grandfather - 2
High School Art teacher - 2
Agent - 1
Bob Roth and Bob McCamant - 1
Childhood friend - 1
Clients - 1
High School English teacher - 1
Everyone but Robert Mankoff - 1
Friends - 1
Grandmother - 1
Grandmothers - 1
Harvey Kurtzman - 1
John Glynn and David Stanford - 1
Mary Votano - 1
No One - 1
Publisher - 1
Sister - 1

Monday, June 14, 2010

Colleen Coover - Cartoonist Survey #134




Born in Iowa in 1969, Colleen Coover is a comic book artist and illustrator. Other than a few art classes in high school and some life drawing courses in college she is mostly self taught. She is the creator and artist of the lesbian-themed erotic comic book, Small Favors which was published by Eros Comix. The first seven issues of Small Favors have been collected into two volumes by Eros and the complete series has also been published in a German translation. Her other comic book series is the all-ages four issue mini-series, Banana Sunday (written by her then boyfriend, Paul Tobin under the name ‘Root Nibot’) from Oni Press which was collected into book form in 2006. Colleen’s comic work can also be seen in Marvel Comics’ X-Men First Class, Spider-Man Family, Power Pack and other Marvel publications. Her illustrations frequently appear in newspapers and magazines including The Seattle Stranger, Portland Monthly, Nickelodeon magazine, The Portland Mercury and Dark Horse Comics. In August of 2007 Colleen married comic book writer Paul Tobin and they presently live and work in Portland, OR. She is a member of Periscope Studio which is a collective of more than twenty artists and writers who share a studio space in Portland. Visit Colleen’s website to see more of her work.

What is your favorite pen to use?
I don’t use a pen very often—I use a Winsor & Newton Series 7 watercolor round brush, size 1.

Do you draw in pencil first and if so do you use a standard pencil or a mechanical one?
Yes, I use a mechanical pencil; one of the cheap plastic thick barrel ones you can get in any school supply section, with F hardness lead.

Do you do your coloring by hand or on the computer?
I use Photoshop on my computer.

If you do your coloring by hand, what do you use?
I do sometimes do watercolor drawings for commission pieces.

What type of paper do you use?
I use Strathmore 500 series Bristol paper.

What thing(s) do you hate to draw?
Tables and chairs, because there are so many legs to draw and make sure they work in perspective.

Do you buy your supplies from big chain art store catalogues/websites or a local one that you physically go to?
There’s a large local art supplier two blocks from my home. I usually go there.

Are there any rituals that you do before starting to draw?
No, not really.

Do you listen to music while you draw and if so what genre?
Not much, though sometimes my studio mates will play music. When they do, I prefer classic rock because it’s fun to sing along to.

Did you read comics as a kid and if so what was your favorite?
I read comics extensively! I liked Harvey comics and any superhero books I could get hold of, but I can’t honestly point to any definite favorites. I was a very non-discriminatory comic book reader.

What is or was your favorite comic strip?
My favorite strip of all time is Terry & The Pirates by Milton Caniff, the adventure strip from the 1930’s and ‘40’s. My favorite strip growing up was probably Peanuts.

What was your favorite book as a child and do you still own a copy of it?
One of my favorite storybooks was The Color Kittens, by Margaret Wise Brown, which is all about a couple of little house-painting kitties who mix paint to make new colors. I learned about color theory at a very young age because of that book! I do not still have a copy, but it’s still in print as a Little Golden Book, and I bought a copy for a friend’s kids a couple of years ago.

Did you have any formal art training and if so where did you receive it?
I took art classes in high school, and some life drawing in college. Other than that, I am self-taught.

Do you feel that the Internet is a blessing or a curse?
Absolutely a blessing. It allows anyone to publish work for little-to-no money, and reach a worldwide audience.

Did either of your parents draw?
No.

Who in your life is/was the most supportive of your art?
My husband, writer Paul Tobin.

Do you keep a sketchbook?
I’ve never been able to keep up the habit.


Have you ever taught cartooning/drawing and if so did you enjoy the experience?
I’ve done a couple of workshops, but I’ve never taught a class. I prefer to teach one-on-one, as I do with some of the interns at my studio. I help them see what they can do differently to make their work better, and of course by teaching them, I learn a lot.

Do you feel that talent or passion is more important in drawing?
Passion is more important, because passion can lead to talent. Talent without passion too often leads to laziness and hackery.

Do you collect anything and if so what?
My husband and I collect original art, both from comics and illustration.

If you were an animated cartoon character who do you think you would be?
Er, maybe a female version of Bugs Bunny, on account of his smart mouth. And I have never yet turned left at Albuquerque.

Are you a righty or lefty?
Righty!

If you weren't an artist what would you want to do for work?
A year ago I would have said go mad and live off the dole, because I can’t do anything else. But now I think I would be a writer, as I realize there’s a lot of storytelling I could do that I don’t get to do in my illustration work.

In one or two sentences describe your drawing area.
I have a drawing table in a large office space shared communally by a couple dozen artists and writers in downtown Portland. We call it Periscope studio.

Do you play any musical instruments?
No. Music is a complete mystery to me.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone who wants to pursue drawing as a career what would it be?
You need to have a fundamental compulsion to draw. If I weren’t getting paid assignments, I would still be making comics on my own. I can’t help it! The best way—the only way, in my view—to get professional work is to show that you are motivated from within.

Who is your favorite artist?
Milton Caniff.



Thanks again Colleen.

Next time on David-Wasting-Paper is editorial cartoonist Nate Beeler.

Saturday, June 12, 2010

New England Chapter of the National Cartoonist Society Dinner

I just wanted to take a minute and thank Mark Parisi (Cartoonist Survey #38) and his wife Lynn for hosting this year's New England Chapter of the National Cartoonist Society dinner. It was held this afternoon at Johnny D's Uptown Restaurant and Music Club in Somerville, MA. and a great time was had by all.

This year's guest speaker was Keith Knight. Not only was Keith's slide show presentation very funny but it was also informative.

While there I also finally got to meet cartoonist John Klossner (Cartoonist Survey #43) who made the drive down from Maine.
Thanks again Mark, Lynn and Keith!

Friday, June 11, 2010

David Collier - Cartoonist Survey #133



Canadian alternative cartoonist David Collier was born in Ontario on January 24, 1963. When he was only 10 he saw some of R. Crumb’s artwork and knew that he wanted to make his own comics. Making mini-comics with his friends as a teen and later submitting work eventually paid off when his first comic strip was published in 1986 in the R. Crumb-edited magazine Weirdo. David joined the Canadian Army and during his serving he was able to draw comic strips for the army newspapers. While in the army he also took up long distance running which he still enjoys. In 1990 he left the army and began cartooning professionally. He created his first comic book series, “Collier’s” with Fantagraphics which was later collected along with most of his anthology submissions in ‘Just The Facts’. During this time he also began a regular illustration and cartooning job for a national newspaper, The Globe and Mail, and his local hometown paper the Saskatoon Star-Phoenix. Some of the anthologies his work has appeared in are The Comics Journal, Duplex Planet Illustrated, Zero Zero and Harvey Pekar’s American Splendor. In 1998 he married the Ontario artist Jennifer Hambleton and a year later their son James was born. In 2000 Drawn and Quarterly published David’s ‘Collier’s Surviving Saskatoon’ which documents the true story of David Milgaard, a man who spent nearly 25 years in prison after he was wrongfully accused of the brutal rape and murder of a nurse in 1969. Drawn and Quarterly began publishing volume two of Collier's solo comic book title “Collier's” in 2002 and in the same year published ‘The Hamilton Sketchbook’, in which he drew about moving with his family from Saskatchewan to Hamilton, Ontario. His ‘The Frank Ritza Papers’ was nominated for a Doug Wright Award for Best Book in 2005. See more of David's work here at his Drawn & Quarterly page.

What is your favorite pen to use?
Hunt #102.

Do you draw in pencil first and if so do you use a standard pencil or a mechanical one?
Wood.

Do you do your coloring by hand or on the computer?
Computer.

If you do your coloring by hand, what do you use?
Pencil.

What type of paper do you use?
Vellum.

What thing(s) do you hate to draw?
Crowds.

Do you buy your supplies from big chain art store catalogues/websites or a local one that you physically go to?
Mixed Media
Hamilton's independent art shop
NEW ADDRESS - 154 James St. N.
Hamilton L8R 2K7
905.529.2323

Are there any rituals that you do before starting to draw?
Cold bath.

Do you listen to music while you draw and if so what genre?
Luke Doucet and Melissa McClelland.

This is artwork David created for Luke Doucet's forthcoming album, "Steel City Trawler" which comes out on August 24th.


Did you read comics as a kid and if so what was your favorite?
Donald Duck.

What is or was your favorite comic strip?
Comic Strip: Toonerville Folks -
Single Panel: Out Our Way
I also looked at the Canadian Strip Birdseye Centre a lot when I was a kid (in reprints).

What was your favorite book as a child and do you still own a copy of it?
Tripod books by John Carpenter- yes.

Did you have any formal art training and if so where did you receive it?
Sheridan College.

Do you feel that the Internet is a blessing or a curse?
Curse- the computer I use for work deliberately has no access.

Did either of your parents draw?
Yes.

Who in your life is/was the most supportive of your art?
My wife.

Do you keep a sketchbook?
Yes.

Have you ever taught cartooning/drawing and if so did you enjoy the experience?
Made a comic with a lunch-time club at my son's school. It was fun, but a lot of work!

Do you feel that talent or passion is more important in drawing?
Passion.

Do you collect anything and if so what?
My house approaches the Collyer Bros., New York, 1944.

If you were an animated cartoon character who do you think you would be?
The horny fox in Tex Avery's famous one.

Are you a righty or lefty?
Left.

If you weren't an artist what would you want to do for work?
Underwater welder.

In one or two sentences describe your drawing area.
Everywhere.

Do you play any musical instruments?
Guitar.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone who wants to pursue drawing as a career what would it be?
Keep on struggling.

Who is your favorite artist?
Jennifer Hambleton.



Thanks very much David!

Up next is comic book artist Colleen Coover.

Wednesday, June 9, 2010

Did Either Of Your Parents Draw? - Cartoonist Survey Answers Compiled

Here are the compiled answers to the question, Did Either Of Your Parents Draw?

The results are based on the answers provided by the first 100 cartoonists/artists.

Did Either Of Your Parents Draw?

Yes - 63

No - 36

Didn't answer this question - 1

Who they listed that drew.

Dad - 26

Mom - 16

Both - 13

Many in the family - 3

Dad and Grandfather - 2

Didn’t say who - 1

Two Grandmothers - 1

Mom and Grandfather - 1


If you want to learn to draw, the books below would be a good starting point.

Monday, June 7, 2010

Lloyd Dangle - Cartoonist Survey #132



Born in May of 1961, Lloyd Dangle is a writer, cartoonist, illustrator and political satirist. He graduated from high school in 1979 and attended the University of Michigan School of Art where he earned a BFA in 1983. While at the University of Michigan, Lloyd was the editor and a contributor to the college magazine, Gargoyle Humor Magazine. He spent awhile as a paste-up artist, designer and cartoonist for filmmaker Michael Moore's Michigan Voice newspaper in Flint, Michigan. Lloyd has a screen credit for sound recording in Moore's first movie, 'Roger and Me'. Moving to New York City in 1983 Lloyd worked for many newspapers and magazines including, Manhattan, the Village Voice, Elle and Nuclear Times. In 1988 he created his syndicated weekly comic strip, Troubletown which originally only ran in the San Francisco Bay Guardian. It now runs in many alternative weeklies such as The Portland Mercury, The Austin Chronicle, The Stranger, as well as The Progressive magazine. Troubletown has been collected in many volumes and is also featured in the anthology ‘Attitude: The New Subversive Cartoonists’. His cartoons and illustrations have also appeared in well over one hundred publications including the New York Times, Entertainment Weekly, Time Magazine, Weirdo, Cosmopolitan, Blab! And Wired.

Lloyd was actively involved in AIDS education by creating artwork for the handbook used in prisons and drug rehab clinics called "The Works." He also helped create a billboard, TV, and print campaign around a superhero, "Bleachman," whose duty was to teach IV drug users to clean their needles at a time when needle exchange programs were illegal in California. As the National President of The Graphic Artists Guild he organized education efforts for artists on copyright issues, contracts, and related business issues. He worked to create a Northern California Chapter of the Graphic Artists Guild and then went on to organize a statewide effort to reform California sales tax regulations. Under the California sales tax regulations, photographers, illustrators and other visual artists were denied protections under copyright that other authors were allowed. Eventually the sales tax regulations were re-written and effectively removed the tax collection burden for California artists selling or licensing rights to reproduce artwork within California. Lloyd lives in Oakland, California with his wife who is a graphic designer and fine artist and their son. Visit the
official Lloyd Dangle website here. You can also see much more of his work on his Troubletown blog. There are all kinds of goodies that you can buy at his Troubletown Megamart.

...and yes he created the company brand and packaging for the cold remedy Airborne.


What is your favorite pen to use?
A brush pen.

Do you draw in pencil first and if so do you use a standard pencil or a mechanical one?
Nope.

Do you do your coloring by hand or on the computer?
Computer.

If you do your coloring by hand, what do you use?
Sometimes I do watercolor.

What type of paper do you use?
Various types depending on my mood.

What thing(s) do you hate to draw?
Nothingness.

Do you buy your supplies from big chain art store catalogues/websites or a local one that you physically go to?
Mr. Art and my local Dick Blick's.

Are there any rituals that you do before starting to draw?
1000 sit-ups, no, not really.

Do you listen to music while you draw and if so what genre?
Drawing yes, but writing no, various kinds, jazz, blues, reggae.

Did you read comics as a kid and if so what was your favorite?
Peanuts.

What is or was your favorite comic strip?
Mr. Natural.

What was your favorite book as a child and do you still own a copy of it?
Go Dog Go...my son has it.

Did you have any formal art training and if so where did you receive it?
University of Michigan School of Art.

Do you feel that the Internet is a blessing or a curse?
Both.

Did either of your parents draw?
Mom a little.

Who in your life is/was the most supportive of your art?
Nobody.

Do you keep a sketchbook?
Always.

Have you ever taught cartooning/drawing and if so did you enjoy the experience?
No.

Do you feel that talent or passion is more important in drawing?
Passion.

Do you collect anything and if so what?
Gray hairs.

If you were an animated cartoon character who do you think you would be?
Popeye or Bluto.

Are you a righty or lefty?
Right handed.

If you weren't an artist what would you want to do for work?
Detective.

In one or two sentences describe your drawing area.
A table in my garage/ studio with lots of pens and brushes in tomato cans.

Do you play any musical instruments?
Guitar, but I suck.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone who wants to pursue drawing as a career what would it be?
I can't honestly say that it's a good idea.

Who is your favorite artist?
There are so many it's impossible. At the moment it might be Basil Wolverton.



Thanks again for participating Lloyd.

Up next is Canadian alternative cartoonist David Collier.

Thursday, June 3, 2010

Brad Diller - Cartoonist Survey #131



Brad Diller is a cartoonist and illustrator who grew up in Charleston, WV and graduated from the Art Institute of Pittsburgh in 1980. Over the years he has worked as not only a cartoonist and illustrator, but has also been a bartender, baker, carpet layer and writer. His cartoons first appeared in 1992 and had a successful 8 year run until 2000 when he decided to leave the newspaper business to be a freelance illustrator. Brad’s comics have been published in The Cleveland Plain Dealer, The Charleston Daily Mail, the Reno Gazette Journal, Funny Times and numerous other papers. He currently draws the very funny single panel cartoon, ‘Funday Morning’, and has also drawn the cartoons ‘One Brick Shy’ and ‘Bumma Dude’. Brad lives in Reno, NV with his wife and their cat. Stop by Brad’s Funday Morning website and read more of his toons. And if you ever need a printing company that specializes in backstage passes, media and security credentials then look no further than Access Pass and Design, where Brad is a partner.

What is your favorite pen to use?
For my final drawings, I use Micron technical pens, gauges 01 and 05. I like them because they’re disposable. I’ve never been able to put a Rapidograph back together and not have it leak. I use the Pigma brush for large areas of black.

Do you draw in pencil first and if so do you use a standard pencil or a mechanical one?
Neither. All of my preliminary work is done with a ballpoint pen up to the final rendering when I use the Microns. I haven’t drawn with a pencil in years.

Do you do your coloring by hand or on the computer?
I’ve used PhotoShop in the past when I was a newspaper illustrator, but currently, I’m only working in black & white.

If you do your coloring by hand, what do you use?
Before I became proficient with a computer in the late 1980s, I used Prismacolor pencils. I could achieve a rather painterly affect and I didn’t have to clean them when I was finished. I’m lazy by nature.

What type of paper do you use?
All of my thought processes are drawn on a legal pad. Once I get an idea to a certain stage, I trace it on vellum. The drawing is then blown up to its final size (7” X 7”) and I retrace it one more time before I trace it on bristol board using a light table.

What thing(s) do you hate to draw?
I’m not too comfortable with anything mechanical or crowd scenes. There are hundreds of cartoonists who render these much better than I do.

Do you buy your supplies from big chain art store catalogues/websites or a local one that you physically go to?
I shop locally – I like to touch what I’m buying. Once I find something I’m satisfied with, I rarely experiment with new products. It sends me into an anxiety attack to have to switch brands once I’ve found something I like.

Are there any rituals that you do before starting to draw?
I usually sketch out my ideas on Sunday afternoon while I’m watching TV. Ideas seem to come to me in surges and I work on several cartoons at a time. This also is a great way to avoid my weekly ironing.

Do you listen to music while you draw and if so what genre?
Rarely, because I get up at 3 a.m. and work before I go to my day job. I’m a partner in a business that prints backstage passes, etc. for the rock ‘n’ roll touring industry and I’m in the office by 7 a.m.

Did you read comics as a kid and if so what was your favorite?
As far as newspaper strips, I read Peanuts (of course) Andy Capp, Hagar, The Phantom, and Steve Roper as a kid. When I grew up, I loved the Far Side, Calvin & Hobbes, Non Sequitur, and For Better or for Worse. For comic books, I was a Marvel freak, especially Spiderman when Steve Ditko was the artist. My interest in comic books faded after Jim Steranko left Nick Fury. I was also into the Warren publications – Creepy, Eerie and Vampirella.

What is or was your favorite comic strip?
Currently, I read Pickles in the newspaper. I read Sheldon by Dave Kellett and Maximus by Frank Roberson online.

What was your favorite book as a child and do you still own a copy of it?
I was a prolific reader as a kid (still am) so I can’t recall any one book that stands out. I read all the Hardy Boys mysteries, Mad and Cracked magazines, typical stuff.

Did you have any formal art training and if so where did you receive it?
I could always draw, but I went to the Art Institute of Pittsburgh, graduating in 1980. There were some drawing classes, but the emphasis was on design.

Do you feel that the Internet is a blessing or a curse?
Blessing. I love being able to interact with the folks who read my cartoons. The only correspondence I got when I was in newspapers was from readers that hated something I’d drawn. It was very much a message in a bottle.

Did either of your parents draw?
I remember my dad having a Walter Foster kit when I was really small, but that’s it.

Who in your life is/was the most supportive of your art?
My wife. She’s believed in me even when I didn’t.

Do you keep a sketchbook?
I don’t. I only draw when I have an idea for a cartoon. I was a newspaper artist for 12 years and drew cartoons on the side, so keeping a sketch book fell by the wayside for me.

Have you ever taught cartooning/drawing and if so did you enjoy the experience?
I’ve never taught cartooning, but I have had private students years ago for drawing. I think I learned more than they did.

Do you feel that talent or passion is more important in drawing?
Passion! If a person has a passion they develop the talent. They can’t help it.

Do you collect anything and if so what?
Not so much anymore. I used to collect jazz CDs, but the Internet has made that a somewhat obsolete pursuit. That and Tower Records closing.

If you were an animated cartoon character who do you think you would be?
The Tasmanian Devil.

Are you a righty or lefty?
I’m a mighty righty. I can’t hold a spoon with my left hand.

If you weren't an artist what would you want to do for work?
As stated earlier, I have another business I’m involved in on a daily basis. I manage the money, something I seem to have a knack for, although I have no formal training. I’m not sure what I’d do if it weren’t for these two pursuits. I only engage in things that interest me.

In one or two sentences describe your drawing area.
I work on a folding banquet table in a spare bedroom of my house. I don’t pay much attention to my surroundings when I’m working, so it’s rather cluttered.

Do you play any musical instruments?
Three guitars and two saxophones – none of which I play well.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone who wants to pursue drawing as a career what would it be?
Draw as often as you can and keep everything you do. When you’re ready to throw in the towel, you can look back at your old work and see you’re making progress.

Who is your favorite artist?
Tough question. Growing up I loved Howard Pyle, Norman Rockwell, Maxfield Parrish, Frank Frazetta, Steve Ditko, Jim Steranko. I liked Jack Kirby, but he didn’t draw very sexy women. Bill Watterson and Dave Kellett are pretty high on my current list. But honestly, there are too many to think of them all.

Thanks again Brad.

Next time on David Wasting Paper is cartoonist, illustrator, and political satirist Lloyd Dangle.