Saturday, October 30, 2010

Ghosts of Halloween Past

Happy Halloween everyone!

Below are some photos of a Halloween-costumed yours truly from many years back.

Your basic hobo.
This one is from 1967...may I present a 5 year-old Hippie. Complete with LSD t-shirt?!
This one was the ghost of a person who was hanged. The head has a beach ball underneath the sheet.
The mask on this was made from plaster of Paris and used the clear outside part of the Renwal Visible Head model as a mold. It went on to become a Gerry Cheevers hockey mask, complete with scars.

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Rina Ayuyang - Cartoonist Survey #182




Rina Ayuyang was born and raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. As a child she was fascinated with cartooning, drawing her own, reading the Sunday funnies and borrowing David Breger’s “How to Draw and Sell Cartoons” from the Shaler North Hills Library over and over again. During college she stopped drawing comics and focused on painting and installation/conceptual art. She graduated from San Francisco State University in 1998 with a major in Art. After discovering the work of cartoonists Chester Brown, Lynda Barry, Dan Clowes and John Porcellino (Cartoonist Survey #154), Rina re-discovered her love of drawing comics and began self-publishing "Namby Pamby", a semi-autobiographical series which focused on the humorous side of everyday life. She has just released her first graphic novel "Whirlwind Wonderland", a collection of her auto-bio comics that was co-published by Portland’s Sparkplug Comic Books and Tugboat Press. In addition to drawing comics, she also co-hosts The Comix Claptrap, a comics podcast with fellow Bay Area cartoonist Thien Pham. Rina lives in Oakland, California with her husband, son and cat. Check out Rina’s website and blog. Click here to purchase her "Whirlwind Wonderland."

What is your favorite pen to use?
My favorite pens are felt tip pens, but my ultimate favorite amongst them is the Pentel Sigma Sign Pen. I love the feel of that pen when I draw in my sketchbook. I also favor cheap brush pens from the local Daiso Japanese superstore. Anything from Uniball or Pentel is great for me.

Do you draw in pencil first and if so do you use a standard pencil or a mechanical one?
I don't normally draw with pencil first, but when a page or panel requires something that needs to be accurate like a car, or a building, I use a blue pencil because I really like to draw in heavy strokes on the page, not very light. So using a regular graphite pencil is murder to erase.

Do you do your coloring by hand or on the computer?
Yes, usually I color by hand, but it depends on the project.

If you do your coloring by hand, what do you use?
I mostly use colored pencils or Sakura crayons for coloring. Also Faber Castell markers.

What type of paper do you use?
Because I use felt tip pens, I use regular sketchbook paper, sometimes charcoal paper because I like the texture.

What thing(s) do you hate to draw?
I don’t think I've found anything yet that I hate drawing, but there are some things that I wish I was better at drawing like people's feet, the side profile of cars. I also wish I drew bottles better. Everything I draw seems to be asymmetric.

Do you buy your supplies from big chain art store catalogues/websites or a local one that you physically go to?
I buy my supplies through both local and online stores depending on what I need. My favorites are Artists and Craftsman Supply in Berkeley, the Kinokuniya stationery store in Japantown; Patrick and Company and University Arts in Downtown San Francisco. I get a lot of fun pens online through Jetpens.com and WetPaint, a store based in Minneapolis, MN.

Are there any rituals that you do before starting to draw?
Hmm, well procrastinate? No, I just sit down on the couch, with a pad of paper, a couple of pens and just start drawing anything, just doodle. I try to start something as a stream of consciousness and go from there.

Do you listen to music while you draw and if so what genre?
Sometimes I do, but often I just like the quiet when I draw. When I do listen, it's mostly electronic, shoegaze type stuff to hypnotize me into drawing, or old easy listening standards, stuff to calm me down a bit.

Did you read comics as a kid and if so what was your favorite?
Oh yeah, I read the Sunday funnies like Nancy, Blondie Peanuts, Doonesbury, collections I could take out from the library like Dick Tracy, Classic Illustrated. I also loved MAD magazine, and random comics from Marvel and DC but also Krazy Kat and Tim Tyler.

What is or was your favorite comic strip?
Peanuts and Nancy. Also Blondie. Right now I'm loving Larry Alcala's Mang Ambo strips.

What was your favorite book as a child and do you still own a copy of it?
Well I loved a lot of illustration, architecture books. I think one of my favorites were the big architecture books by David MacAulay like "Cathedral" and "Pyramids". I also loved the Choose Your Adventure books especially the ones that were illustrated by Paul Granger (aka Don Hedin). I still have a lot of those books from the series and love looking at those illustrations.

Did you have any formal art training and if so where did you receive it?
I got a BA in Art, Conceptual Art/Information Arts at San Francisco State University.

Do you feel that the Internet is a blessing or a curse?
Well both, I feel like the Internet can be a useful resource but is also totally can be abused in a way. Twitter makes me crazy. I guess I'm biased because I am a web designer too, and also much of the art I was making before comics incorporated the web and computer technology. I think though that we could stand to use a break from the Internet from time to time.

Did either of your parents draw?
My parents drew stuff like doodles for me when I was little. One time my dad demonstrated how to draw a coconut tree and a bahay kubo/nipa hut for this story I wanted to do when I was in second grade. Sometimes if I really beg them, they'll oblige still, but they aren't professional artists or didn't have any formal training. I have a feeling though that they probably draw a lot, but they do it in secret.

Who in your life is/was the most supportive of your art?
Well my family for sure. My parents even though they were a doctor and a lawyer, have totally been supportive of my creative art goals and haven't nagged me to be a brain surgeon. I think my dad thinks I'm going to make a lot of money like Charles Schulz. Anyway, my siblings and I constantly drew a lot as kids, and my older sister really got me into painting and drawing and art history. My husband also introduced me to comics again years and years after I had abandoned it during college when I focused more on painting and installation and that crazy stuff.

Do you keep a sketchbook?
I keep a lot of sketchbooks in random places. I have a sketchbook specifically for the bus ride to work for drawing sketches and writing some ideas. I have the thick Fabriano sketchbook at home supposedly for notes and drawings for my current project. I have a little one to take with me to draw with a friend down the street at a coffee shop... I have a feeling I collect sketchbooks more than I draw consistently in them.

Have you ever taught cartooning/drawing and if so did you enjoy the experience?
I have never done it. I do show my son how to make marks with crayon. I think I'd have fun teaching kids to draw rather than grown-ups. I'm not great at public speaking or verbalizing things but find it more comfortable talking to kids. Perhaps if it was an online class, then I might be good at it.

Do you feel that talent or passion is more important in drawing?
Well that's tough, I definitely think passion is important, otherwise it just feels like a chore, and the lack of motivation can be obvious in the art or the end product. I do think having or acquiring some basic skills in drawing helps a lot, or at least working hard to at least improve your skills is key, but I don't think talent is required and as necessary as passion.

Do you collect anything and if so what?
I collect a lot of comics, books, music, probably also pens. Apparently I also collect sketchbooks.

If you were an animated cartoon character who do you think you would be?
People say I'm Lucy from Peanuts, but that's not true. I think I'm Sally. I would love to be Nancy though and witty as Bugs Bunny.

Are you a righty or lefty?
I'm a lefty. Actually I'm a lefty when I draw or write but a righty for everything else.

If you weren't an artist what would you want to do for work?
I would like to be a publisher someday. I'd also like to own a bookstore/cafe with my husband.

In one or two sentences describe your drawing area.
My drawing area used to be a cluttered drafting table, in an office but that turned into the baby's room. Now my drawing area is a lap-desk, otherwise it's pretty much non-existent.

Do you play any musical instruments?
I play the guitar horribly. I used to play the recorder very well. I can play a tune on the piano.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone who wants to pursue drawing as a career what would it be?
Observe the world around you, Keep drawing. After you finish one comic, just continue onto the next one. Never stop and stay in love with it.

Who is your favorite artist?
I have a lot of favorites from various places: Michelangelo, Raymond Pettibon, Bruce Conner, Blutch, Picasso, Edward Hopper, Barry McGee, David Park, Richard Diebenkorn, Rodin, Lynda Barry, Jaime Hernandez, the list goes on and on…

Thanks very much Rina.

Phil Yeh, cartoonist, illustrator and founder and president of Cartoonists Across America & the World will be next.

Monday, October 25, 2010

Thom Zahler - Cartoonist Survey #181




Ohio cartoonist and illustrator Thom Zahler graduated from the Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphic Art. After graduating Thom moved back to Ohio and worked as a caricaturist at an amusement park. He then worked as an advertising artist at a suburban newspaper and later become an art director at an advertising agency. In November of 2001 he quit his job as art director and became a full-time freelancer with his Thom Zahler Art Studios. His artwork was used in the nationwide Prilosec advertising campaign and has appeared in numerous magazines and newspapers across the US. He has written and drawn three graphic novels: “Raider: From the Shadows”, "Raider: A Cold Day in Heaven” and “Raider: Dead Men’s Tales.” He has also created work for Marvel Comics, The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo and the Cleveland Indians’ “Slider” comic strip.

Thom appears on both television and radio on the Cleveland broadcast media and was a contestant on the syndicated version of “Who Wants To Be a Millionaire?” where he walked away with a cool $32,000. Thom is best known for his Harvey Award-nominated comic “Love and Capes.” Described as a superhero romantic comedy, “Love and Capes” follows Abby an ordinary bookstore owner and her accountant boyfriend Mark who just happens to be the super-powered crime fighter, the Crusader. Two volumes of “Love and Capes” that collect the first 12 issues have been printed by IDW Publishing. On October 2nd of this year, Thom setup his art studio in the Great Lakes Mall for the 24-Hour Comics Day and in front of all the shoppers, he created a full 24-page comic titled “Haunted.” The complete “Haunted”
comic is available here as a pdf. See more of Thom’s work at his Thom Zahler Art Studios website, “Love and Capes” site and here on his blog.

What is your favorite pen to use?
For inking, I'm far more a brush guy. Raphael #2, sometimes a Windsor Newton #2 in a pinch. Pens in particular, I use the Microns. They have just enough flex to them to get a bouncy line.

Do you draw in pencil first and if so do you use a standard pencil or a mechanical one?
I do draw in pencil first. These days I start out with blue Col-Erase pencil and then tighten with a mechanical pencil with an HB lead.

Do you do your coloring by hand or on the computer?
I color on computer. I haven't worked by hand in years.

If you do your coloring by hand, what do you use?
Wacom Intuos 3 tablet with mostly Photoshop. I use Painter when I want some more textured effects, but it runs kind of slow on my Mac so I tend to use it sparingly.

What type of paper do you use?
I use Canson tracing paper to start. On Love and Capes I ink on Canson Marker/Layout Paper with the tracing paper taped to the back of it. For commissions and things that need to be on good paper, I use a Canson two-ply smooth bristol.

What thing(s) do you hate to draw?
Cars. I hate cars. Mechanical stuff leaves me cold and it shows in what I do, I'm afraid. I've found that using Microns and a French Curve to draw and ink gives a little more life than a ruler.

Do you buy your supplies from big chain art store catalogues/websites or a local one that you physically go to?
I go wherever the supplies are. Here in Northeast Ohio, we've got Pat Catan's and Utrecht. Catan's is good for staples like paper, ink and board. Utrecht only sells their own brushes, so I tend to avoid them. If I'm out of state and can hit a Pearl or especially the Kubert School store, I'll buy brushes there. I like seeing them in person and dipping them in water, seeing how they hold a tip.

I prefer to buy bulk things online at
Cheap Joe's or Pearl. Col-Erase pencils, pads, etc. I'll order brushes from Kubert online in a pinch.

Are there any rituals that you do before starting to draw?
Not really. At Kubert, one of my teachers beat into me that all you do at your drawing board is draw so that your brain associates work and the table, kicking you into gear faster. Working at my table is probably the biggest ritual for me.

Sometimes I roll my socks halfway down my feet. I don't need to do that, but it does seem to happen more often than not.


Do you listen to music while you draw and if so what genre?
I'm more a talk radio/podcast/news channel guy. It kind of simulates a conversation and keeps my mind engaged while I'm working, and satisfies part of my need to be around people.

Did you read comics as a kid and if so what was your favorite?
I've been reading comics since two and a half. I love Superman and always have, and being the first book I read will always have a special place in my heart. Firestorm is probably my favorite character, though, because I got to jump on his adventures from the beginning.

What is or was your favorite comic strip?
Bloom County, hands down. I learned most of my comedy from that. These days I dig Fox Trot, and I think Rose is Rose is one of the best drawn strips out there.

What was your favorite book as a child and do you still own a copy of it?
I don't recall having a favorite book. I know I liked that Grover "Monster at the End of this Book", but I don't own a copy anymore.

Did you have any formal art training and if so where did you receive it?
I'm a graduate of the Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphic Art. Before that, I took all the art classes my high school had.

Do you feel that the Internet is a blessing or a curse?
Technology is neither good nor bad, only characterized by how it's used. For me, though, it's indispensable. It's my art library and allows me to promote my work more fiercely and directly than I could have years ago. I would not have been able to do the work I do. My "Love and Capes" series, and before that "Raider" would not have been possible before the 'net.

Did either of your parents draw?
My Dad drew, even went to art school. His sister is an artist, too. My whole family is pretty artistic and crafty, from woodworking to cake decorating to crocheting. I'm the first one to go professional, though.

Who in your life is/was the most supportive of your art?
I've got a pretty good support network. My maternal Grandmother was my biggest fan, and it's her that I named my publishing imprint for. But both my parents, whole family and friends have always been as helpful as can be.

Do you keep a sketchbook?
Yes, but not religiously. I use it for idea capture more than technique.

Have you ever taught cartooning/drawing and if so did you enjoy the experience?
I have, and in fact I'm teaching a cartooning class to fifth graders right now. Its hit and miss based on the students. A good group is energizing, and a group that needs a lot of discipline… well, that's not my forté. Generally, I find I'm far more comfortable with one-day workshops than I am with multiple classes.

Do you feel that talent or passion is more important in drawing?
Passion overall. But in the talent vs. passion, I liken it to baseball. You may be born able to throw a 95 MPH fastball (talent) but you've got to apply yourself to learn how to spot the ball and play the game (passion). Passion will fill in the gaps in your talent.

Do you collect anything and if so what?
I collect some glasses. I've designed most of the Toon Tumbler glasses, so I've got a complete set of those. I have a bunch of action figures, too. Mostly the DC set. I've slowed down my purchasing of those, though. There are only so many Supermans I need before I have enough. But give me a Blue Devil or Captain Atom and I'm all over that.

If you were an animated cartoon character who do you think you would be?
Kyle Rayner from the Superman Animated series. He looked like me, talked like me, and dressed like 90's me. Plus, he was an artist.

Are you a righty or lefty?
Righty.

If you weren't an artist what would you want to do for work?
Writer, for sure. I think that's part of being a cartoonist. Past that, stand-up or acting. I'd love to play one of those small character roles, like Kevin Pollack in "A Few Good Men". Unfortunately, I'm cursed by these leading man good looks.

In one or two sentences describe your drawing area.
Hardwood floors, brick walls, glass and metal furniture. Honestly, it kind of looks like Michael Newman's place from "Now and Again."

Do you play any musical instruments?
I played a little bit of guitar when I was a kid. I'm no good at it. It's one of my regrets, and one of these days I'll learn to play something.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone who wants to pursue drawing as a career what would it be?
You can always get anything you want, it's just a question of what are you willing to do to get it. If you do the work, the practice, the networking and sweat equity, you'll carve out a piece for yourself. Lots of people have unwritten stories and undrawn masterpieces. Don't be them.

Who is your favorite artist?
Curt Swan's the biggest influence on my art overall. Right now, I'm leaning towards Darwyn Cooke and Claire Wendling.



Thanks again Thom!

Cartoonist Rina Ayuyang is up next.

Friday, October 22, 2010

Scott Chantler - Cartoonist Survey #180




Graphic novelist and illustrator Scott Chantler was born in 1972. He has been nominated for the Joe Shuster, Russ Manning, Doug Wight, Harvey and Eisner Awards. Scott is the artist for Oni Press’ graphic novels Days Like This, Scandalous and Stephen Colbert’s Tek Jansen. He is the writer and artist for Northwest Passage; originally a three-volume graphic novel but now collected into a single annotated edition. Northwest Passage is the story of the colonial Canadian northern frontier in 1755, when British, French, and private interests competed for the lucrative fur trade. This past August his Tower of Treasure (Three Thieves) was released and is the first book in a three part series for kids ages 8 – 12. The story in Tower of Treasure revolves around Dessa, a 14-year-old orphan who is an acrobat in a traveling circus in search of her long-lost twin brother. Scott’s most recent work, Two Generals is scheduled to be released next Tuesday. Two Generals is an intensely researched graphic novel that tells the accounts of his grandfather and his grandfather’s best friend during the Allied invasion of Normandy in 1944.

Scott has done animation work for the BBC/CBC children’s series Shoebox Zoo and he directed the short film Gone with the Wind in Sixty Seconds. As an illustrator his clients have included Reebok, McDonald’s, Macy’s, The New York Daily News, Atlanta Magazine, The National Post, The Toronto Star, Maclean’s and many others. He also teaches Writing for Graphic Novels at
Max the Mutt Animation School in Toronto. Scott and his wife live in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. To see more of Scott’s work head on over to his website, where he just put up a great post on creating a magazine cover illustration. You should also pay a visit to his Two Generals Research Blog.

What is your favorite pen to use?
Unlike a lot of artists, I'm not actually that fussy about tools and materials. I tend to like to try new things, or just use what's on hand, or that's cheap and available. So I might at any time be using a variety of brushes, nibs, markers, Pitt pens, etc. And the one I'm using that day is my favourite that day.

Do you draw in pencil first and if so do you use a standard pencil or a mechanical one?
Yes, and it's usually a mechanical pencil. I use two of them, one filled with regular lead and the other with non-photo blue lead.

Do you do your coloring by hand or on the computer?
Computer, definitely.

What type of paper do you use?
Like most comic book artists, 11"x17" Strathmore bristol.

What thing(s) do you hate to draw?
I'm sure you hear this a lot, but cars and crowds.

Do you buy your supplies from big chain art store catalogues/websites or a local one that you physically go to?
A little bit of both. I buy paper in bulk, which they don't have at the local shop, so I need to order it online.

Are there any rituals that you do before starting to draw?
Not really. I don't even warm up. I just sit down and dive in.

Do you listen to music while you draw and if so what genre?
I listen to music more or less all the time, whether I'm drawing or not. A lot of it depends what I'm working on. If I'm writing, it's classical or instrumental jazz. When I'm penciling, it'll be anything that's engaging and creative: indie rock, etc. When I'm inking it's anything that's lively and fun, like swing or rockabilly. When I get tired of music, I also listen to a lot DVD commentaries, podcasts, old Charlie Rose or Inside the Actors Studio interviews, just to get some voices in the room and be inspired by other creative folks.

Did you read comics as a kid and if so what was your favorite?
When I was really little, it was Batman, and other superheroes. But by the time I was 12 or 13 and started getting really seriously interested in comics, it was fantasy comics like Conan the Barbarian and DC's The Warlord that really bent my crank.

What is or was your favorite comic strip?
Calvin & Hobbes, by a country mile.

What was your favorite book as a child and do you still own a copy of it?
I don't remember any books from when I was very little, but when I was around eleven or so I began to read "adult" fantasy novels like Terry Brooks’ The Sword of Shannara. I still had my beaten, cover-less copy floating around until just recently. I tried to read it for the first time as an adult, and realized that it was a piece of completely derivative rubbish.

Did you have any formal art training and if so where did you receive it?
I have a year of university fine arts, and also had a high school art teacher who drilled figure drawing into me, bless her. But other than that, no.

Do you feel that the Internet is a blessing or a curse?
Clearly, it's both.

Did either of your parents draw?
Absolutely not.

Who in your life is/was the most supportive of your art?
My mom, for sure. And more recently, my wife.

Do you keep a sketchbook?
I do, but it's nearly empty. Unlike a lot of artists, I really don't sketch much. I'm almost working on a finished piece that I'm going to get paid for. It takes me literally years to fill a sketchbook, which I use mostly for working out character designs and such. I really don't know where a lot of artists find the time to draw for fun.

Have you ever taught cartooning/drawing and if so did you enjoy the experience?
Not cartooning or drawing specifically, but I do teach Writing for Graphic Novels at Max the Mutt Animation School in Toronto, a course I created myself which deals with a lot of visual storytelling concepts.

Do you feel that talent or passion is more important in drawing?
The debate about craft or expression is a false one. The two things are by no means mutually exclusive, and people who think art is strictly the domain of one or the other make me feel sorry for them. Clearly, both are important.

Do you collect anything and if so what?
Nope. I don't really "get" the collector mentality.

If you were an animated cartoon character who do you think you would be?
To steal an answer from Chuck Jones: I'd like to think I'm Bugs Bunny, but in truth I'm probably Daffy Duck.

Are you a righty or lefty?
Righty.

If you weren't an artist what would you want to do for work?
I've tried doing other kinds of work, and it's just not for me. I really can't imagine being anything but an artist of some kind. But I do enjoy teaching my college class, so if I really had to choose, that'd be it.

In one or two sentences describe your drawing area.
A messy drafting table piled with reference material.

Do you play any musical instruments?
I play guitar, a little bit.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone who wants to pursue drawing as a career what would it be?
Too many artists, especially new ones, undervalue their work because they feel like they're just lucky to be doing it at all. And it's true; this is something you do for love, not money. But that's no excuse for not treating it like a business, being a professional, knowing your rights, and trying to make it as profitable as you can.

Who is your favorite artist?
Will Eisner, without question.



Thank you Scott!

Up next is the creator, author and artist of the comic book series Love and Capes, Thom Zahler.

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Leigh Rubin - Cartoonist Survey #179




Leigh Rubin is the syndicated cartoonist of the single panel cartoon Rubes. While standing in the greeting card section of a pharmacy in 1978 he realized that he could create and sell his own line of cards. He dropped out of Pierce College in Los Angeles in 1979 and started his own publishing business, Rubes Publishing. In 1981 "Notable Quote,” his first cartoon collection, was published. Leigh started self-syndicating Rubes, his single panel cartoon in 1984. Four years later Rubes was picked up by Creators Syndicate and now appears in more than 400 newspapers. To date there have been over 10 million Rubes greeting cards, t-shirts and calendars sold and over 14 comic collections published. His most recent release, “The Wild and Twisted World of Rubes” celebrates Rubes 25th anniversary (now in his 26th year) and is packed with the best of his cartoons that he handpicked himself. In addition to drawing Rubes, Leigh also gives cartooning workshops and presentations to schools and professional organizations throughout the country. He lives in California with his wife and three sons. Visit his Rubes Cartoons website where you can buy his books and prints, send Rubes e-cards and even book Leigh for a speaking event. The holiday season is rapidly approaching; get your shopping done early by ordering some of Leigh’s books and the 2011 edition of his ever popular “Rubes Zoo in a Box” desk calendar.

What is your favorite pen to use?
I use three different sizes of Rapidograph technical pens. (They are welcome to send me a lifetime supply if they’d like to...or offer me a substantial endorsement deal).

Do you draw in pencil first and if so do you use a standard pencil or a mechanical one?
I prefer Mars Lumograph 3-B pencils. No other pencil will do. They are also welcome to offer me a substantial endorsement deal.

Do you do your coloring by hand or on the computer?
By hand only....But I am willing to switch to a computer if there is a computer company willing to offer me a substantial endorsement deal. (Apple, are you listening?)

If you do your coloring by hand, what do you use?
Good old-fashioned colored pencils. However I am thinking of returning to my early roots...crayons.

What type of paper do you use?
It’s a super-secret due (Classic Crest) to the confidential terms of a very lucrative endorsement deal.

What thing(s) do you hate to draw?
Hate is such a strong word. But even then, I cannot think of anything I even have an intense dislike of. If there’s something funny about it, I’ll draw it.

Do you buy your supplies from big chain art store catalogues/websites or a local one that you physically go to?
Sadly, my local art supply store went belly up and so now it’s all online.

Are there any rituals that you do before starting to draw?
Do you mean other than the occasional goat sacrifice?

Do you listen to music while you draw and if so what genre?
I prefer to work in silence until I develop a concept. Once I come up with an idea I can play music, listen to lectures, make phone calls, watch reruns of Law and Order, etc, etc, etc.

Did you read comics as a kid and if so what was your favorite?
Geez, doesn’t everyone?! Peanuts was probably me early on favorite.

What is or was your favorite comic strip?
My favorite one changes day to day. I’m pretty fickle that way. Whichever one gives me the biggest laugh that day is my favorite.

What was your favorite book as a child and do you still own a copy of it?
"Kippy the Koala." My sister owns it. She's nuts about koalas.

Did you have any formal art training and if so where did you receive it?
I majored in advertising arts in college. Naturally life got in the way and I never did complete that degree so if anyone at Pierce College in Woodland Hills, California is listening I’m more than willing to accept an honorary degree.

Do you feel that the Internet is a blessing or a curse?
The internet is just the internet, neither a blessing nor a curse. It is what you make of it. I do find it useful.

Did either of your parents draw?
My parents art both artistic in different ways. My mom is an amazing knitter. Love those sweaters! My dad taught me how to draw my first cartoon character when I was six or seven. Thanks dad, now just look what I’ve done with my life.

Who in your life is/was the most supportive of your art?
Both my parents were highly supportive...and now I am highly supportive. I support a family of five.

Do you keep a sketchbook?
I would gladly to trade it for a nice villa on the Mediterranean.

Have you ever taught cartooning/drawing and if so did you enjoy the experience?
I have done some workshops and it’s always a kick to see someone say that up until that time they’ve never been able to draw and now they can. Very fun.

Do you feel that talent or passion is more important in drawing?
Please substitute “lovemaking” for drawing and then ask me that question again.

Do you collect anything and if so what?
Just cartoons. I have about twenty-six years worth right about now.

If you were an animated cartoon character who do you think you would be?
Hmmm, definitely not a super hero. I am quite fond of Bugs Bunny.

Are you a righty or lefty?
I’m a moderate.

If you weren't an artist what would you want to do for work?
Sorry. There is and never was a plan “B.”

In one or two sentences describe your drawing area.
Chaotically organized.

Do you play any musical instruments?
Sadly, no. But I have spent my entire retirement on music lessons for my kids.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone who wants to pursue drawing as a career what would it be?
Become a doctor or a lawyer. It’s a much more secure way to make a living and you’ll have plenty of disposable income in which to become a patron of the arts, especially cartoonists.

Who is your favorite artist?
Like ice cream, whatever flavor I find most desirable at the time.



Thanks for taking the time to answer Leigh.

Next time on David Wasting Paper is graphic novelist and freelance illustrator Scott Chantler.

Monday, October 18, 2010

Mattias Adolfsson - Cartoonist/Artist Survey #178

Click on the drawings to see more detail.



Mattias Adolfsson is a freelance illustrator from Sweden. He earned a Master’s of Fine Arts in graphic design at HDK School of Arts and Crafts, Gothenburg. After he graduated in 1995, he worked for a small game company called Tati creating 3D animation. Mattias then worked at Dice (now a part of Electronic Arts) and a company called Simbin before getting bored with the games industry and deciding to become a freelance illustrator. In 2006 he started his Mattias Inks sketch blog where he posts his pen and ink drawings of subjects including sketches from life, architectural fantasies, animals, robots and much more. Now a full-time freelance illustrator, his work has been exhibited throughout the world. Mattias lives just outside of Stockholm in Sigtuna with his wife (also an illustrator) and their two children. Visit his website here and be sure to set aside some time to go through his blog and see his wonderful drawings.

What is your favorite pen to use?
Namiki Falcon fountain pen with a fine nib.

Do you draw in pencil first and if so do you use a standard pencil or a mechanical one?
I used to go without but for saving time I do some quick rough lines and with a mechanical one.

Do you do your coloring by hand or on the computer?
By hand, haven't got the handle on the digital stuff.

If you do your coloring by hand, what do you use?
Watercolors.

What type of paper do you use?
I use watercolor paper form Saunders and Waterford 300 gr satin.

Do you buy your supplies from big chain art store catalogues/websites or a local one that you physically go to?
I tend to go in person when shopping for paper, when buying sketchbooks I use the web though.

Are there any rituals that you do before starting to draw?
No rituals, I have almost no starting time.

Do you listen to music while you draw and if so what genre?
Yes, but almost as much to online courses. When it comes to music it's everything from Zappa to modern electronica.

Did you read comics as a kid and if so what was your favorite?
Yes I did, Tintin was the big favorite.

What is or was your favorite comic strip?
If I had to choose one I would have to go for Snoopy (I just read the Schulz biography and that made me re-find it).

What was your favorite book as a child and do you still own a copy of it?
I read the Lord of the Rings very early and I still have it.

Did you have any formal art training and if so where did you receive it?
I have a masters of fine arts from HDK in Gothenburg.

Do you feel that the Internet is a blessing or a curse?
For me it has been a blessing, there is no way I would have reached as far as I have without it.

Did either of your parents draw?
Yes my mother is/was an Illustrator, my father came from a very poor upbringing but he had great skills (he never had the possibility to develop it though).

Who in your life is/was the most supportive of your art?
My mother.

Do you keep a sketchbook?
Yes constantly, I feel half dressed without it.

Have you ever taught cartooning/drawing and if so did you enjoy the experience?
No but I have taught digital medias (3d modeling and 3d animation).

Do you feel that talent or passion is more important in drawing?
I think both ways work; for me it was hard work.

Do you collect anything and if so what?
No, I'm a lousy consumer.

If you were an animated cartoon character who do you think you would be?
Mr. Potato Head.

Are you a righty or lefty?
I'm a righty and proud of it.

If you weren't an artist what would you want to do for work?
I would like to have been a scientist.

In one or two sentences describe your drawing area.
Tidy, not so tidy, catastrophic, tidy, not so tidy, catastrophic...repeat.

Do you play any musical instruments?
No unfortunately.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone who wants to pursue drawing as a career what would it be?
Draw, draw, draw and be prepared for some starving in the beginning.

Who is your favorite artist?
I love Caravaggio.



Thanks again Mattias!

Leigh Rubin of the syndicated Rubes Cartoons is up next.

Friday, October 15, 2010

Jeffrey Brown - Cartoonist Survey #177




Jeffrey Brown is a comic book writer and artist who was born in 1975 in Grand Rapids, Michigan. In 2000 he moved from Michigan to Chicago and started studying for his MFA at the School of the Art Institute. He originally focused on painting but decided he’d rather draw comics. Jeffrey won the Ignatz Award in the category of Outstanding Mini-Comic in 2003 for his I Am Going To Be Small. His first self-published graphic novel was the autobiographical Clumsy; the story of a long-distance relationship. It went on to be published by Top Shelf Productions along with his other autobiographical works; Unlikely, AEIOU: Any Easy Intimacy, Every Girl is the End of the World For Me, Little Things: A Memoir in Slices, Funny Misshapen Body and most recently, Undeleted Scenes. Jeffery has also drawn many humor and parody titles such as; Bighead, issues one and two of the Incredible Change-Bots and his two cat books Cat Getting Out of a Bag and Cats Are Weird.

Sulk is his latest series and is comprised of digest-sized satirical graphic novels with topics including superheroes, robots, giant monsters and pirates. Three issues of Sulk have already been published and future issues will be released on a quarterly basis. His work has been featured in the Drawn and Quarterly Showcase, MOME, McSweeney’s #13 and the 2007 edition of The Best American Comics. Jeffrey directed the animated music video for Death Cab for Cutie's "Your Heart is an Empty Room", has contributed to NPR's This American Life and illustrated the movie poster for the feature-length documentary, Rabbit Fever (having it’s World Premier this coming Sunday at the Heartland Film Festival). Bruce Parsons’ 2009 documentary, Drawing Between the Lines, explores Jeffrey’s process and provides insight from friends, fans and fellow cartoonists. Jeffrey lives in Chicago with his wife and their son. Head over to
his website and have a look around. You should also visit his blog where he has been recently posting about the cartooning class he’s teaching at his alma mater, the School of the Art Institute.

What is your favorite pen to use?
It used to be the Uniball Deluxe Micro, and that's the sentimental favorite I suppose, but I've started to use Faber Castell Pitt Artist pens lately. It might just be a phase.

Do you draw in pencil first and if so do you use a standard pencil or a mechanical one?
I usually don't pencil, but when I do it's never a mechanical pencil. Occasionally it's a Staedtler non-photo blue, but usually it’s a Staedtler Mars Lumograph 3H or 4H.

Do you do your coloring by hand or on the computer?
By hand. I've tried coloring on the computer, but I don't like it much, and I'm not very good at it.

If you do your coloring by hand, what do you use?
Faber Castell brush pens.

What type of paper do you use?
For book projects I draw in whatever blank sketchbook I have or can find that fits best in terms of size, page count and paper. I've used handmade books and printer's dummy books and I still use my original favorite the Watson Guptill blank sketchbook. For shorter stories or covers I occasionally use vellum bristol but usually I draw on illustration board.

What thing(s) do you hate to draw?
Vehicles and buildings.

Do you buy your supplies from big chain art store catalogues/websites or a local one that you physically go to?
I'd probably buy locally, but with my wife needing the car for work and me being the stay at home dad, I usually just order online these days.

Are there any rituals that you do before starting to draw?
Mostly just pulling out different things to work on, looking at them, prepare to draw, then put them away and do the same thing with other projects.

Do you listen to music while you draw and if so what genre?
Sometimes I'll watch hockey or the Lord of the Rings films, but usually it's listening to indie rock.

Did you read comics as a kid and if so what was your favorite?
I grew up reading a lot of Marvel comics, and X-Men was my favorite.

What is or was your favorite comic strip?
I don't know if I have a favorite these days - I like Keith Knight's strips. My past favorites are Garfield, Far Side and Calvin & Hobbes.

What was your favorite book as a child and do you still own a copy of it?
"Small In The Saddle" by Mark Alan Stamaty. I lost my original copy, but got a new one for Christmas five years ago.

Did you have any formal art training and if so where did you receive it?
I received an MFA in studio painting and drawing from The School Of The Art Institute Of Chicago.

Do you feel that the Internet is a blessing or a curse?
Most blessings are also curses, and the Internet is a shining example of that.

Did either of your parents draw?
My dad drew a little, usually airplanes and emergency vehicles in profile on place mats at restaurants.

Who in your life is/was the most supportive of your art?
I've been lucky to have an incredible amount of support from family, friends, publishers and strangers, but I would have to say my parents.

Do you keep a sketchbook?
I try to, but I don't draw in it nearly as much as I'd like to or used to. Of course, most of my comics are drawn in sketchbooks, so in a way I keep a bunch of sketchbooks.

Have you ever taught cartooning/drawing and if so did you enjoy the experience?
I'm teaching a comics class for the first time right now. I think I'm enjoying it, although I get nervous about it and think I'm not so great at it. My teaching style seems to be some kind of 18 simultaneous independent studies.

Do you feel that talent or passion is more important in drawing?
Hard work is the most important thing, so I guess that'd be passion.

Do you collect anything and if so what?
I sort of collect hockey cards, but only casually. I'm trying to repress all of my collecting urges and tendencies.

If you were an animated cartoon character who do you think you would be?
Eek the Cat.

Are you a righty or lefty?
Righty.

If you weren't an artist what would you want to do for work?
I would want to play professional football or hockey.

In one or two sentences describe your drawing area.
It's wherever I have my sketchbook and some pens. Usually it's at a local coffee shop.

Do you play any musical instruments?
Not by any reasonable standard.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone who wants to pursue drawing as a career what would it be?
Draw more. However much you're drawing, if it's not your career yet, you're not drawing enough.

Who is your favorite artist?
If I had to narrow it down to just one I would say Julie Doucet, Chris Ware, Charlotte Salomon and, er... Moebius.



Thanks very much Jeffrey.

The next set of answers come all the way from Sweden and are provided by illustrator, artist and 3D animator Mattias Adolfsson.

Tuesday, October 12, 2010

Fintan Taite - Cartoonist Survey #176


Award winning freelance illustrator and cartoonist Fintan Taite lives in Dublin, Ireland. He is a current member and former chairman of the Illustrators Guild of Ireland and has been awarded the Best Editorial Illustrator from the Guild. He has produced work for newspapers and magazines including the Sunday Tribune, The Dubliner, Magill and The Irish Times. As an illustrator he has also created artwork for books, ad campaigns, theater posters and even labels for wine bottles. Fintan’s first comics work was “The Ring” which he drew for the 2009 anthology 'Machines, Miracles or Magic'. “The Ring” was picked up by indie publisher Blurred Books and published in the first issue of ‘Pood’, their Big IF comics imprint. ‘Pood’ is a 16-page, full color broadsheet newspaper anthology that features many of today’s alternative comics creators. Fintan has just finished up a second strip for ‘Pood’ that will be published in Issue #2 coming out next month. Check out his website to see more of his work. You can see even more examples of his art over at the Lemonade Illustration Agency who recently started representing Fintan.

What is your favorite pen to use?
I use dip pens and my favorite nib of the moment is the Leonardt EF Principal.

Do you draw in pencil first and if so do you use a standard pencil or a mechanical one?
I usually draw my roughs with a blue or red col-erase pencil.

Do you do your coloring by hand or on the computer?
Both…depends on the job.

If you do your coloring by hand, what do you use?
Watercolours, acrylics.

What type of paper do you use?
Arches 300 lb hot pressed.

What thing(s) do you hate to draw?
Backgrounds!

Do you buy your supplies from big chain art store catalogues/websites or a local one that you physically go to?
All of them, but mostly from websites.

Are there any rituals that you do before starting to draw?
Eat breakfast.

Do you listen to music while you draw and if so what genre?
Talk radio.

Did you read comics as a kid and if so what was your favorite?
Spider-Man or anything by MARVEL or DC. I also loved the Tintin books by Herge and Asterix the Gaul by Goscinny and Uderzo.

What is or was your favorite comic strip?
Cul de Sac by Richard Thompson (Cartoonist Survey #125)...genius!

What was your favorite book as a child and do you still own a copy of it?
The collected short stories of Ray Bradbury...and yes, I still have it.

Did you have any formal art training and if so where did you receive it?
I studied animation for 3 years in Dun Laoghaire Institute of Art Design & Technology in my home town of Dublin Ireland.

Do you feel that the Internet is a blessing or a curse?
Both.

Did either of your parents draw?
No, but they had a great love of books, art and old movies which they passed on to me.

Who in your life is/was the most supportive of your art?
My lovely wife.

Do you keep a sketchbook?
I buy a lot of expensive sketchbooks that I rarely end up using…preferring instead to doodle on cheap typing paper...less pressure.

Have you ever taught cartooning/drawing and if so did you enjoy the experience?
Yes, to school children...nerve wracking but great fun.

Do you feel that talent or passion is more important in drawing?
I don't think talent develops without passion...so passion wins by a nose.

Do you collect anything and if so what?
I collect cartoonist’s work of the 50,s and 60's particularly Ronald Searle...possibly the greatest draughtsman of the 20th century.

If you were an animated cartoon character who do you think you would be?
Choo Choo from Top Cat!

Are you a righty or lefty?
Lefty or 'Citeog’ which is the Irish expression for a lefty!

If you weren't an artist what would you want to do for work?
Write...or sing with a big band swing orchestra.

In one or two sentences describe your drawing area.
Messy...lots of pens nibs and brushes lying around the desk area with my computer, A3 scanner and filing cabinet on the opposite side of the room.

Do you play any musical instruments?
No, but I like to sing...see above.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone who wants to pursue drawing as a career what would it be?
Stick to what you believe in and never work for less than you're worth. As my Dad used to say, you'll always be busy if you work for free!

Who is your favorite artist?
Ronald Searle

Thank you Fintan.

Ignatz Award winning comic book writer and artist Jeffrey Brown provides the next set of answers.

Sunday, October 10, 2010

Mark Dean Veca - Cartoonist/Artist Survey #175





Be sure to click the pictures below to see the detail.



Artist Mark Dean Veca was born in Shreveport, LA and grew up in Livermore, CA. He started drawing when he was very young and knew all along that he wanted to be an artist. Living close to San Francisco he grew up reading the underground comics from the late sixties and seventies. His influences include: Dr. Seuss, MAD magazine, old Popeye cartoons and Bill Griffith’s (Cartoonist Survey #14) ‘Zippy the Pinhead’. In 1985 Mark received his Bachelor of Fine Arts from Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles. He had originally planned to become an illustrator but one of his professors persuaded him to become a fine artist.

His work has been exhibited at The Bronx Museum of the Arts, The Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Brooklyn Museum of Art and many other institutions throughout the United States, Japan and Europe. Numerous publications such as Artforum, The New York Times, Art Review, Juxtapoz, Flash Art and Art in America have reviewed his work. He has received the New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship in the category of painting three times. Mark has also been the artist in residence at The MacDowell Colony, The Bronx Museum and Villa Montalvo. Be sure to visit Mark's website and see more of his amazing artwork.

What is your favorite pen to use?
No pen, brush. Loew-Cornell 795 White Nylon Round #2 and #3 and Superblack India Ink.

Do you draw in pencil first and if so do you use a standard pencil or a mechanical one?
A little; standard.

Do you do your coloring by hand or on the computer?
Hand.

If you do your coloring by hand, what do you use?
Flashe Vinyl Acrylic.

What type of paper do you use?
Canvas or panel.

What thing(s) do you hate to draw?
Anything hard-edged.

Do you buy your supplies from big chain art store catalogues/websites or a local one that you physically go to?
Both.

Are there any rituals that you do before starting to draw?
No.

Do you listen to music while you draw and if so what genre?
Howard Stern 20 hours/week, Adam Corolla's podcast and Greg Fitzsimmons podcast.

Did you read comics as a kid and if so what was your favorite?
MAD, Zippy, Freak Bros.

What is or was your favorite comic strip?
Zippy.

What was your favorite book as a child and do you still own a copy of it?
The Hobbit, no.

Did you have any formal art training and if so where did you receive it?
BFA, Otis Art Institute, Los Angeles, CA

Do you feel that the Internet is a blessing or a curse?
Blessing!

Did either of your parents draw?
Not really.

Who in your life is/was the most supportive of your art?
Parents.

Do you keep a sketchbook?
No.

Have you ever taught cartooning/drawing and if so did you enjoy the experience?
No.

Do you feel that talent or passion is more important in drawing?
Passion.

Do you collect anything and if so what?
No.

If you were an animated cartoon character who do you think you would be?
Popeye.

Are you a righty or lefty?
Righty.

If you weren't an artist what would you want to do for work?
Musician.

In one or two sentences describe your drawing area.
Small converted 2 car garage.

Do you play any musical instruments?
No.

Who is your favorite artist?
Philip Guston.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone who wants to pursue drawing as a career what would it be?
See Charles Bukowski's poem, "Roll the Dice". (editor's note: I've actually read quite a bit of Bukowski's work but had never read "Roll the Dice." I've posted it below so you can read it for yourself.)

Roll the Dice - Charles Bukowski

if you’re going to try, go all the
way.
otherwise, don’t even start.

if you’re going to try, go all the
way.
this could mean losing girlfriends,
wives, relatives, jobs and
maybe your mind.

go all the way.
it could mean not eating for 3 or 4 days.
it could mean freezing on a
park bench.
it could mean jail,
it could mean derision,
mockery,
isolation.
isolation is the gift,
all the others are a test of your
endurance, of
how much you really want to
do it.
and you’ll do it
despite rejection and the worst odds
and it will be better than
anything else
you can imagine.

if you’re going to try,
go all the way.
there is no other feeling like
that.
you will be alone with the gods
and the nights will flame with
fire.

do it, do it, do it.
do it.

all the way
all the way.

you will ride life straight to
perfect laughter, its
the only good fight
there is.


Thanks again Mark!

Up next is Fintan Taite, freelance illustrator and cartoonist from Dublin, Ireland.

Friday, October 8, 2010

Adrian Tomine - Cartoonist Survey #174




Adrian Tomine was born in Sacramento, CA in May of 1974. During high school he started writing and drawing fictional and autobiographical comics and in 1991 he published his first mini-comic, ‘Optic Nerve’. One year later he was creating a monthly comic strip for Tower Records store magazine Pulse! Adrian pursued a degree in English Literature, graduating from the University of California, Berkeley. In 1994 Drawn & Quarterly started producing his 'Optic Nerve' as a regular comic series. Adrian’s series went on to win him the 1996 Harvey Award for Best New Talent. Many of his early mini-comics were then collected in “32 Stories: The Complete Optic Nerve Mini-Comics.” 1997 saw the release of “Sleepwalker and Other Stories” which is comprised of the first four Drawn and Quarterly issues of ‘Optic Nerve’.

In addition to his comics, Adrian’s work has been published in magazines such as Rolling Stone, Time, Esquire and The New Yorker. He has also produced CD and album covers for the Eels, The Softies, Weezer and the Crabs. The second ‘Optic Nerve’ collection, “Summer Blonde” was issued in 2002 and was followed by 2004’s “Scrapbook”. “Scrapbook” collects of the all strips from Pulse! and a lot of his illustration and design work. His latest release “Shortcomings” contains the comics from ‘Optic Nerve’ issues 9 through 11. He has recently worked with Drawn and Quarterly designing and editing three collections of alternative manga from the legendary cartoonist Yoshihiro Tatsumi; “A Drifting Life”, “Black Blizzard” and “The Push Man & Other Stories.” He has a new book coming out next year, “Scenes from an Impending Marriage”, that chronicles his and his wife’s preparations for their wedding. Adrian lives in Brooklyn, NY with his wife and their soon to be one year old daughter. Stop by
Adrian’s website where you can buy some of his original art and follow his comings and goings.

What is your favorite pen to use?
Tachikawa "G" and "school" nibs, Hunt 102 nib, various Rapidographs.

Do you draw in pencil first and if so do you use a standard pencil or a mechanical one?
Yes: 0.3 mechanical, either 4H or UniColor non-repro blue.

Do you do your coloring by hand or on the computer?
Mostly on the computer, unfortunately.

If you do your coloring by hand, what do you use?
A combination of cheap watercolors and expensive dyes.

What type of paper do you use?
I used to buy Strathmore 500 4-ply sheets, but I noticed the quality was declining so much, I couldn't justify the cost anymore. So now I just buy the cheap tablets (which aren't any better in terms of quality, but at least aren't so expensive). The main problem I've had is bleeding...I'll have an image all penciled, and then that first touch of the pen feathers out and looks horrible. So even though I don't really like it, I use the smoother surface bristol now, just because it tends to bleed less. And actually, I just finished a book that was drawn entirely on Strathmore recycled drawing paper. Working on cheap paper actually freed me up in some way and made the whole process more fun.

What thing(s) do you hate to draw?
Revisions.

Do you buy your supplies from big chain art store catalogues/websites or a local one that you physically go to?
I either go to New York Central or I order from Cheap Joe's.

Are there any rituals that you do before starting to draw?
Changing my daughter's diaper and putting her down for a nap.

Do you listen to music while you draw and if so what genre?
The two classical stations on Sirius XM.

Did you read comics as a kid and if so what was your favorite?
Yes, and too many to list. "Peanuts" was the first comic I ever really fell in love with, but my tastes quickly eroded and I found myself buying a lot of not-so-great Marvel comics from the 70s.

What is or was your favorite comic strip?
Peanuts, Gasoline Alley, and Little Orphan Annie.

What was your favorite book as a child and do you still own a copy of it?
A big stack of Peanuts paperbacks, and yes.

Did you have any formal art training and if so where did you receive it?
No, but I got a lot of informal art training just by getting to know a bunch of great cartoonists.

Do you feel that the Internet is a blessing or a curse?
It's too integrated into my life for me to take either stance.

Did either of your parents draw?
Yes.

Who in your life is/was the most supportive of your art?
I feel like most people in my life have been supportive, actually. I guess I'm fortunate in that way. Really, the only people that I can think of who were actively unsupportive were the art teachers I had who had an aversion to comics and illustration.

Do you keep a sketchbook?
In general, my sketchbook is almost like an insane person's notebook. Just scribbles and notes, mostly. But if I know that in the near future I'll have to publish some examples from my sketchbook, I suddenly start trying to do my best Crumb/Ware imitations.

Have you ever taught cartooning/drawing and if so did you enjoy the experience?
I did it once when I was an idiotic teenager, and it was a complete disaster. For one assignment, I told the students to make up their own characters and to draw a comic book cover featuring them. One kid drew the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, and I said something like, "I hope your name is either Kevin Eastman or Peter Laird, because I told you to make up your OWN characters!" Did I mention these kids were seven years old?

Do you feel that talent or passion is more important in drawing?
Too hard to parse.

Do you collect anything and if so what?
At this point, just books. Having a kid has gone a long way towards breaking my obsessive collecting habits.

If you were an animated cartoon character who do you think you would be?
One of the adults in a Peanuts cartoon.

Are you a righty or lefty?
Righty.

If you weren't an artist what would you want to do for work?
I think I might like to work in one of those newsstand kiosks in Manhattan.

In one or two sentences describe your drawing area.
Other cartoonists who see my studio almost always comment on how weirdly tidy and spartan it is.

Do you play any musical instruments?
The level of my ability doesn't even merit a "yes" answer to this question, but there is an instrument or two in my apartment.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone who wants to pursue drawing as a career what would it be?
Marry someone rich.

Who is your favorite artist?
I actually don't have just one.



Thanks again for your time Adrian.

Next up is the creator of some really wild art, Mark Dean Veca.