Monday, May 30, 2011

Sergio Cariello - Cartoonist Survey #227




Sergio Cariello is a comic book artist who was born in Recife, Brazil in April of 1964. He knew he wanted to be a cartoonist from the age of 5. When he was only 11 he created the comic strip “Frederico, the Detective” which ran in his local paper, Diario De Pernambuco, for 3 years. Sergio drew political caricatures for this same paper as well. He studied at the Joe Kubert School of Cartoons and Graphic Arts and won the Dark Horse scholarship, which went toward his second year there. While at the Joe Kubert School he worked on his first comic book, “Dagon, the Worlds of HP Lovecraft” for Caliber Press and also worked as a Bullpen letterer for Marvel. While working for Marvel he was given Daredevil #328 to pencil which led to him working on Conan, Thor, Captain America, Spider-Man, The Avengers and more.

Sergio moved to DC Comics and worked on Deathstroke, The Flash, New Gods, Superman, Green Lantern, Wonder Woman, Batman, Blue Beetle Azreal and others. In 1997 during a slowdown in work, he was hired by Joe Kubert as an instructor at his school. For the seven years he was there Sergio taught various courses including, Methods, Basic Drawing, Color, Paste Ups, Story Adaptation, Caricature and Life Drawing. In 2006 he was contacted by David C. Cook Publishing and was offered the job of illustrating the Action Bible; an updated version of The Picture Bible. He accepted the job and the book was released last September.

He is currently the penciler for Dynamite Entertainment's “The Lone Ranger” and also draws "Son of Samson” for Zondervan. Sergio was recently picked to draw the upcoming “DC Retroactive: Superman-The 80’s” which will be released this coming August. A member of the National Cartoonists Society, he lives in Florida with his wife Luzia and their West Highland White Terrier, Monique. Visit his website to see much more of his work and follow him on his blog.

Watch this short video of Sergio discussing the process he used in illustrating “The Action Bible”.


What is your favorite pen to use?

Crowquil 102, Manga Studio EX Maru pen.

Do you draw in pencil first and if so do you use a standard pencil or a mechanical one?

Both.

Do you do your coloring by hand or on the computer?

Both.

If you do your coloring by hand, what do you use?

Watercolors.

What type of paper do you use?

Bristol.

What thing(s) do you hate to draw?

Bad, wrong looking drawings.

Do you buy your supplies from big chain art store catalogues/websites or a local one that you physically go to?

Both .

Are there any rituals that you do before starting to draw?

Coffee, music, references.

Do you listen to music while you draw and if so what genre?

Movie scores.

Did you read comics as a kid and if so what was your favorite?

Spider-Man, Asterix, Tintin.

What is or was your favorite comic strip?

Prince Valiant by Hal Foster.

What was your favorite book as a child and do you still own a copy of it?

It was a book on Walt Disney.

Did you have any formal art training and if so where did you receive it?

Kubert School.

Do you feel that the Internet is a blessing or a curse?

Mostly a blessing but sometimes a distraction.

Did either of your parents draw?

My mother.

Who in your life is/was the most supportive of your art?

My mother.

Do you keep a sketchbook?

Not really...I draw all over the place.

Have you ever taught cartooning/drawing and if so did you enjoy the experience?

Taught 7 years at the Kubert School. Loved it.

Do you feel that talent or passion is more important in drawing?

Passion.

Do you collect anything and if so what?

Art books and selected comics.

If you were an animated cartoon character who do you think you would be?

Seven (character I created who introduces my website).

Are you a righty or lefty?

Lefty.

If you weren't an artist what would you want to do for work?

Work with animals.

In one or two sentences describe your drawing area.

Cluttered.

Do you play any musical instruments?

Acoustic guitar.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone who wants to pursue drawing as a career what would it be?

Draw a lot, pray a lot, act a lot.

Who is your favorite artist?

Joe Kubert.



Thanks again Sergio.

Sunday, May 29, 2011

Richard Thompson Wins The 2011 Reuben Award!

Congratulations to cartoonist extraordinaire and all-around nice guy Richard Thompson for winning this year's Reuben Award for Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year.

Richard was one of the many cartoonists who invaded Boston this weekend for the 65th Annual Reuben Awards.

Here is the full list of winners:

The Reuben Award for Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year

Television Animation
Dave Filoni - Supervising Director / Production Designer, “Star Wars: The Clone Wars”

Feature Animation
Nicolas Marlet - Character Designer "How to Train Your Dragon"

Newspaper Illustration

Gag Cartoons

Greeting Cards

Newspaper Comic Strips

Newspaper Panel Cartoons

Magazine Feature/Magazine Illustration

Book Illustration

Editorial Cartoons

Advertising Illustration

Comic Books

Graphic Novels

Congratulations to all of this year's winners!

You can read Cartoonist Surveys for three of the winners:

Richard Thompson (Cartoonist Survey #125)


Dave Whamond (Cartoonist Survey #107)

Tuesday, May 24, 2011

Peter Dunlap-Shohl - Cartoonist Survey #226





Award winning Alaskan cartoonist Peter Dunlap-Shohl has been drawing since the age of six. He lives in the foothills of the Chugach Mountains in Anchorage, Alaska with his wife Pamela who is a graphic designer and their son Wiley. He has lived there most of his life, including during 1964’s Great Alaskan Earthquake, the most powerful recorded earthquake to hit North America.


Peter was the editorial cartoonist for the Anchorage Daily News for over 25 years, drawing four cartoons a week and creating animations for the paper’s website. He also drew and presided over the paper’s weekly, local political cartoon caption contest. In 2002 Peter won first place in the Society of Professional Journalists Northwest regional editorial cartoon competition and he has also received multiple awards from the Alaska Press Club, including their First Amendment Award.

Peter was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 2002 but continued to work for the Anchorage Daily News for several more years. Upon his diagnosis he decided to start a blog about living with Parkinson’s. This blog Off & On, The Alaska Parkinson’s Rag is filled with his cartoons, animations and illustrations. Over time his drawings reflected the effects that Parkinson’s and the medication he was taking were having on his motor skills. Peter became the leader of the Anchorage Parkinson’s Disease Support Group. Through his Off & On blog, which became a clearinghouse of information on Parkinson’s, he has improved the life of others with this disease.

He now freelances and all of his drawing is done digitally on the computer. In addition to his Off & On blog, he runs the blog Frozen Grin which contains political cartoons, animations, short comic pieces and songs. You can view an archive of Peter’s Anchorage Daily News cartoons here and his animations about Alaska politicians can be watched here. To get your very own Peter Dunlap-Shohl swag, visit his Frozen Grin Big Box store. Peter is not only a talented cartoonist, but he also plays multiple instruments and performs with his wife and others in the band Whiskey Jacks. Check out the Whiskey Jacks blog to learn more and give the band a listen.


What is your favorite pen to use?

I am now all digital, all the time. For ergonomic reasons, I began using an Intuos pad and stylus in combination with Photoshop several years ago. Nibs never clog, and I never run out of ink. And my Mac rarely crashes.

Do you draw in pencil first and if so do you use a standard pencil or a mechanical one?

I usually do a rough on a layer in Photoshop, knock down its opacity to between 20 and thirty then use it as a guide for layers above that will be composited down to the final drawing.

Do you do your coloring by hand or on the computer?

Computer, in the process described above.

What thing(s) do you hate to draw?

I can learn to hate anything! Foreshortening gives me fits, but I love it when it works. Drawing for me is all about pushing my rendering limits, and then having my limits push back.

Do you buy your supplies from big chain art store catalogues/websites or a local one that you physically go to?

This question is mooted by my use of the computer. Plus there are no art chain stores here in remote and savage Alaska.

Are there any rituals that you do before starting to draw?

Rituals? We're supposed to do rituals??? See what you miss if you don't go to art school?

Do you listen to music while you draw and if so what genre?

I love a wide variety of music from all directions, with a bias toward the many incarnations of the guitar. I especially like Marc Ribot, Martin Carthy, Bill Frisell, Goran Sollscher, and of course that other Richard Thompson. I'm also a big fan of the music of New Orleans. Professor Longhair and Alan Toussaint etc. I'm also a big fan of Don Byron, who is a terrific clarinet player. I could go on... Renaissance music anyone?

Did you read comics as a kid and if so what was your favorite?

Peanuts, Tales from the Crypt, Eerie, CARtoons, and Mad magazine.

What is or was your favorite comic strip?

Abiding love for Peanuts, The Far Side, Doonesbury, Calvin and Hobbes, and Cul de Sac. Also a huge fan of Edward Sorel, Ronald Searle, Patrick Oliphant, and George Booth, Clay Bennett, Edward Gorey, and a guy I used to work with, Dee Boyles, who is now a plein aire landscape painter with formidable chops.

What was your favorite book as a child and do you still own a copy of it?

Hmmm... a toughie. I'm going with "The Thirteen Clocks" I've got both a paperback edition that I found in England illustrated by Ronald Searle and the NYRB reissue with the fabulous Marc Simont paintings.

Did you have any formal art training and if so where did you receive it?

I was an art major at Whitman College, where I spent most of my time watching the pottery wheels go round and round.

Do you feel that the Internet is a blessing or a curse?

For me it has been a creative blessing and, as a former newspaperman a financial disaster.

Did either of your parents draw?

My dad was handy with a pencil and certainly encouraged me. Thanks Dad.

Who in your life is/was the most supportive of your art?

Let's split that one between my dad and my wife. Thanks Pam.

Do you keep a sketchbook?

Sporadically.

Have you ever taught cartooning/drawing and if so did you enjoy the experience?

I have done a great deal of one-on-one mentoring, which I greatly enjoyed.

Do you feel that talent or passion is more important in drawing?

Passion.

Do you collect anything and if so what?

Books, music, stringed instruments.

If you were an animated cartoon character who do you think you would be?

Wile E. Coyote, a microsecond before impact.

Are you a righty or lefty?

Righty.

If you weren't an artist what would you want to do for work?

Garbage man.

In one or two sentences describe your drawing area.

Light, cluttered, small, vital.

Do you play any musical instruments?

Guitar, Dobro, Mandolin, piano.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone who wants to pursue drawing as a career what would it be?

If you love it enough to endure and learn from multiple failures go for it. You risk plenty in choosing any path in life. It will be easier to accept your second choice or third, etc if you give your first choice a decent shot. Life is long.

Who is your favorite artist?

There are quite a few listed above, to which I would add James Turrell and Andy Goldsworthy. But I have to say that for a sheer aesthetic thrill nothing equals the lean perfection and idiosyncratic brilliance of a Martin Carthy guitar line.

You can learn more about the challenges of Parkinson’s disease by reading this interview with Peter over at the Comic Riffs blog. Comic Riffs has also recently posted this profile of cartoonist Richard Thompson (Cartoonist Survey #125) who also has Parkinson’s disease.



If you would like to get involved in the fight against Parkinson’s head over to the Team Cul de Sac page at Michael J. Fox’s Team Fox website where you can make a donation.

Thanks again Peter!

Friday, May 20, 2011

The Ink Well Foundation

Those that know me or follow this blog know that I have a soft spot for kids. Previously I have let you know about kid-related charities such as the Ace Bailey Children's Foundation and Aid for Aidan.

Today I would like to spotlight the Ink Well Foundation. The Ink Well Foundation is a non-profit organization that is made up of professional cartoonists, illustrators and animators who share their time drawing with children who are facing illness. The goal of the Ink Well Foundation is to "let the kids draw with the very artists who create their favorite film, TV, and illustrated characters. We hope to share the power of art as self-expression, and as a good way to just take a break from trying times and have some fun!"


This talented group of artists have brightened the faces of children at places such as The Ronald McDonald House, Children's Hospital of Minnesota, New York Methodist Hospital, Gilda's Club, Bellevue Hospital, Mount Sinai Hospital and more. The artists involved "have worked on such projects as Ice Age, Robots, The Rugrats, Speed Racer, and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles; comic books such as Batman, Archie and Mad Magazine; as well as illustrations for New York Magazine, The New Yorker, Random House, Simon and Schuster, and many more."

In addition to organizing in-person visits, the Ink Well Foundation recently started the IWF Link and Paint Program which links artists with children who are physically unable to attend an event.

The Ink Well Foundation was founded by Elizabeth Winter who was was diagnosed with cancer as a teenager and remembers "the long nights and lonely days in the hospital and how having visitors to talk to and make me laugh made all the difference." Elizabeth is cancer free and during her career in animation has worked on Beavis and Butthead, The Rugrats, The Wild Thornberry's and others.

The list of artists who have participated is long and includes some of the people you've read about here at David Wasting Paper including, Ray Alma (Cartoonist Survey #124), Ed Steckley (Cartoonist Survey #108) and Dan Piraro (Cartoonist Survey #28).



If you are a professional cartoonist, illustrator or animator consider contacting The Ink Well Foundation to participate. Their email address is: info@inkwellfoundation.org. If you are a non-professional wannabe cartoonist like me you can still help out by making a donation through PayPal or by mailing a check made out to "The Ink Well Foundation" to:

The Ink Well Foundation
54 West 16th St. #12J
NY, NY 10011

You can also support them by purchasing a t-shirt.


Tuesday, May 17, 2011

Paul Combs - Cartoonist Survey #225





Lieutenant Paul Combs is an award winning illustrator, cartoonist and firefighter/EMT. He received a degree in Fine Art from Defiance College in 1991. He is a 15-year veteran of the Bryan, Ohio Fire Department where he is a Firefighter II, NREMT-B, HazMat Technician. Paul is also an Instructor for the City of Bryan Fire Training Academy where he teaches basic and advanced fire suppression, auto extrication, ventilation and ground ladder courses. As an illustrator his artwork has been published worldwide in newspapers, books and magazines; both print and online. He is the former editorial cartoonist for the Tampa Tribune, has been nationally syndicated through Tribune Media Services, Inc. and has had his cartoons published in multiple years of the “Best Editorial Cartoons of the Year” book series. He currently contributes editorial cartoons to Fire Engineering Magazine, FireEngineering.com, JEMS magazine and Public Safety Communications. In September of 2010 Paul’s book “Drawn by Fire” containing more than 150 of his fire service editorial cartoons was published. “Drawn by Fire” is available through all major booksellers, but you can also get a signed copy through his website. There you will also find signed and numbered limited edition Giclee prints of Paul’s cartoons for sale. See much more of Paul’s work here at his Art Studio Seven website and follow him on his blog.

Please show your support for our first responders by making a donation to the Firefighter Cancer Support Network.


What is your favorite pen to use?

I use primarily Pigma Micron pens (assorted sizes).

Do you draw in pencil first and if so do you use a standard pencil or a mechanical one?

Yes, everything thing I draw is penciled first with traditional Derwent wood drawing pencils.

Do you do your coloring by hand or on the computer?

After my work is inked, it gets scanned into Photoshop for painting.

What type of paper do you use?

Strathmore Bristol Smooth

What thing(s) do you hate to draw?

I love drawing everything!

Do you buy your supplies from big chain art store catalogues/websites or a local one that you physically go to?

I shop at an art store in Ft. Wayne, IN for most supplies, but will use online stores like Cheap Joe's for hard to get items.

Are there any rituals that you do before starting to draw?

Coffee! Lots and lots of coffee! And, my studio has to be spotless with everything in its place - OCD, I suppose.

Do you listen to music while you draw and if so what genre?

Yes! I will listen to classical, movie scores, or jazz instrumentals while thinking and composing an idea. Will switch over to rock or blues for the actual drawing.

Did you read comics as a kid and if so what was your favorite?

Captain America and Superman are my favorites, but I read just about all of them religiously!

What is or was your favorite comic strip?

Far Side and Calvin & Hobbes

What was your favorite book as a child and do you still own a copy of it?

My books were always comic books (drew my first one at age four) - and I wish I still had those! $$$

Did you have any formal art training and if so where did you receive it?

Have a degree from The Defiance College in fine art, but am mostly self-taught.

Do you feel that the Internet is a blessing or a curse?

Blessing. It gives artists new ways to communicate and share their work like never before. It can be a tool for research, marketing, and selling our work.

Did either of your parents draw?

No

Who in your life is/was the most supportive of your art?

My mother, and now my wife of twenty years - she's incredible! I would have divorced me years ago:)

Do you keep a sketchbook?

Oh, yes - 24/7. It goes everywhere I go...

Have you ever taught cartooning/drawing and if so did you enjoy the experience?

Never formally, but it's something I'd like to pursue in the near future.

Do you feel that talent or passion is more important in drawing?

It's 50/50. Technical skills are important and draw interest to your work, but if there's no meaning or passion behind what you are doing, what's the point.

Do you collect anything and if so what?

No, not really - I do not need another distraction.

If you were an animated cartoon character who do you think you would be?

The Tick - I'm kind of stupid like that:)

Are you a righty or lefty?

Righty.

If you weren't an artist what would you want to do for work?

Well, I'm already a fireman, so I get to live both dreams.

In one or two sentences describe your drawing area.

Neat woodsy decor with warm natural colors on hard wood floors that creek and drive my family crazy - especially when I do the mamba with my cat, Chloe!

Do you play any musical instruments?

Guitar - Fender Strat.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone who wants to pursue drawing as a career what would it be?

Be passionate about art, and draw, draw, draw, draw, and then do some more drawing. After 45 years, I still learn something new every time I sketch.

Who is your favorite artist?

Berkeley Breathed probably tops my list, but it's a very crowed list!



Thank you very much for your time Paul.

Thursday, May 12, 2011

Tom Gammill - Cartoonist Survey #224






Emmy Award-winning comedy writer, producer and cartoonist Tom Gammill was born in May of 1957 in Darien, Connecticut. He has been drawing cartoons his whole life and while in college at Harvard some of his comics ran in the Harvard Lampoon. After graduating Tom teamed up with Max Pros, who he met at Harvard, to write comedy. The two started out writing for Saturday Night Live in 1979 and since that time have worked on some of the best known TV comedies. Together they have written for It’s Garry Shandling’s Show, The Wonder Years, Seinfeld, Monk, Late Night with David Letterman, The Simpsons and many more. Tom and Max have also been producers on shows such as The Simpsons, Futurama and The Critic and won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Animated Program in 2001 for the Simpson’s episode “HOMR”.

In 2007 during the Writers Guild strike, Tom used the break to start his “Learn to Draw” series of videos on YouTube. As a kid he had collected instructional books on comics which always touted wild claims of fame and fortune by using their time tested methods. Tom’s “Learn to Draw” videos feature himself as an inept cartoonist who is completely oblivious to the fact that he’s no good. The videos often include legendary cartoonist such as Mell Lazarus, Robert Mankoff and Matt Groening who are completely nonplussed by his lack of cartooning skills.

Tom has also created a comic strip to go along with his “Learn to Draw” series called The Doozies. The strip focuses on Dean Doozie, a “lovable boob”, his wife Dana, daughter Eve and Dean’s dad. The Doozies appears daily at GoComics.com and is also printed in the Sierra Madre Weekly, Pasadena Independent, Monrovia Weekly, Arcadia Weekly and the Temple Tribune. Tom lives in Pasadena, CA with his wife Sandy Gillis who is also a writer. They have two children, Henry and Alice. Be sure to read The Doozies daily at GoComics.com and check out The Doozies official website where you can see many of Tom’s “Learn to Draw” videos. You can view all (currently 26) of the “Learn to Draw” videos here on YouTube.

What is your favorite pen to use?

I love the Uni-ball medium black pen, I carry them everywhere. But I draw The Doozies on a Wacom Cintiq.

Do you draw in pencil first and if so do you use a standard pencil or a mechanical one?

It's all on the Cintiq.

Do you do your coloring by hand or on the computer?

On the computer with Photoshop.

What thing(s) do you hate to draw?

I think of a lot of jokes that I can't end up doing because my drawing is so lousy. I can draw a hand holding a telephone or a newspaper or a pen but that's about it as far as hands are concerned.

Are there any rituals that you do before starting to draw?

I turn on the computer which leads to me checking my email which leads me to reading some websites so I guess that's a ritual.


Do you listen to music while you draw and if so what genre?

No, I like quiet.

Did you read comics as a kid and if so what was your favorite?

Peanuts, Beetle Bailey, New Yorker cartoons, Momma.

What is or was your favorite comic strip?

Ernie Bushmiller's Nancy for all different reasons.

What was your favorite book as a child and do you still own a copy of it?

I loved all the Syd Hoff kids’ books, also "Harold and the Purple Crayon".

Did you have any formal art training and if so where did you receive it?

None.

Do you feel that the Internet is a blessing or a curse?

It's here to stay, get used to it.

Did either of your parents draw?

No, and I think it kind of made them nervous that I liked to draw. They were worried I was going to grow up and be poor.

Who in your life is/was the most supportive of your art?

I make my living writing for TV and all my TV writer friends think I'm a better cartoonist than a writer.

Do you keep a sketchbook?

I write on scripts I'm working on.

Have you ever taught cartooning/drawing and if so did you enjoy the experience?

I love telling people how to draw. Check out my YouTube shorts -- Google "Tom Gammill Lesson One" to see the first one.



Do you feel that talent or passion is more important in drawing?

Definitely talent because I have the passion but I still can't draw a hand.

Do you collect anything and if so what?

Ernie Bushmiller's Nancy.

If you were an animated cartoon character who do you think you would be?

I was once in a Simpson’s episode -- I worked in the nuclear power plant. It's Season Two - "Homer the Mascot," I think. Mr. Burns says, "Look, it's the Gammills!"

Are you a righty or lefty?

Draw right.

If you weren't an artist what would you want to do for work?

I love writing for TV.

In one or two sentences describe your drawing area.

It's a computer and a Cintiq, surrounded by some cool original cartoon art by Patrick McDonnell, Mell Lazarus, KAZ and Bob Dunn.



Do you play any musical instruments?

Sax but I haven't for a few years.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone who wants to pursue drawing as a career what would it be?

Go for it!

Who is your favorite artist?

Today it's William Steig; I was just looking at a book of his old New Yorker cartoons.

Thank you very much Tom!

Tuesday, May 10, 2011

What Is Your Favorite Pen To Use? - Part 2



It's hard to believe it was over a year ago that I compiled the answers to the question, "What Is Your Favorite Pen To Use?" for the first 100 participants of the Cartoonist Survey. Now that there are over 220 sets of answers I figured it was time to post the compiled answers for the next 100 participants. The number in parentheses before the pens is the number of cartoonists who responded that it is their preference. Please note that some of the answers provided did not give a specific brand, but rather specified "dip Pen" or "brush and ink" etc. Also note that not all participants answered this question.

These are the favorite pens of the participants of Cartoonist Surveys #101 - #200.





(15)Pigma Micron
(9) Hunt nib
Breakdown of Hunt nibs;
(5) Hunt 102
(1) Hunt 108
(1) Hunt 22
(1) Hunt 104
(1) Hunt bowl pointed

(7) Digital pen - Wacom
(6) Dip pen
(6) Faber-Castell Pitt
(6) Winsor Newton Series 7
(5) Rapidograph
(4) Brush and ink
(3) Pentel Pocket Brush
(3) Sharpie
(3) Various
(3) Japanese brush pen
(2) Pencil and scan - no pen
(2) Rotring Art Pen
(2) Staedtler Pigment Liners

The rest were preferred by only one cartoonist each;

#3 Sable brush
Alvin Penstix
Artline 200 series
Bic classic
Bic Roller Ball micro
Esterbrook 255 nib
Esterbrook 369 Maritime nib
Gillott 290
Lamy fountain pen
Linoleum Cutter (for Linocuts)
Loew-Cornell 795 #2 brush
Mars Staedtler Graphic 3000 Duo
Namiki Falcon fountain pen
Paper Mate Flair
Pentel Sigma Sign pen
Pilot Precise V5
Raphael #2 brush
Speedball A-5 nib
Speedball Crow Quill
Tachikawa "G"
Tombow GCD - 11 brush pen
Uni Pin Fine Line
Uni Posca Paint pens
Uni-ball Roller
Uni-ball Vision

Since I am a little OCD, I went and assembled the combined answers from all participants of Cartoonist Surveys #1 - #200.




(23) Pigma Micron
(19)Hunt nib
Breakdown of Hunt nibs;
(7) Hunt 102
(2) Hunt
(2) Hunt 101
(2) Hunt 108
(2) Hunt 513EF
(1) Hunt 22
(1) Hunt 100
(1) Hunt 104
(1) Hunt bowl pointed

(15) Digital pen -Wacom
(12) Rapidograph
(12) Winsor Newton Series 7
(10) Faber-Castell Pitt
(9) Pentel Pocket Brush
(8) Dip pen
(7) Sharpie
(6) Gillott nib
Breakdown of Gillott nibs;
(2) Gillot 303
(1) Gillot 850
(2) Gillot 290
(1) Gillot 170

(6) Brush and ink
(6) Rotring Art pen
(4) Staedtler Pigment Liners
(4) Papermate Flair
(4) Various
(3) Esterbrook nib
Breakdown of Esterbrook nibs;
(1)Esterbrook 369 Maritime nib
(1)Esterbrook 255 nib
(1)Esterbrook dip pen

(3) Speedbal Crow Quill
(3) Japanese brush pen
(2) Pencil and scan - no pen
(2) Pentel Uni-ball
(2) Lamy Fountain pen
(2) Bic Classic
(2) Pilot Precise V5
(2) Raphael Kolinsky #2 brush

The rest were preferred by only one cartoonist each;

#2 Cotman Winsor & Newton brush
#3 Sable brush
Alvin Penstix
Anything
Artline 200 series
Bic Roller Ball micro
Brause "Blue Pumpkin" Steno nib
Delta fountain pen
Dixon Markette
Gillott 290
Grumbacher brush
Handmade Japanese pen
Kuretake brush pen
Linoleum Cutter (for Linocuts)
Loew-Cornell 795 #2 brush
Mars Staedtler Graphic 3000 Duo
Medium Ballpoint
Namiki Falcon fountain pen
Nikko G nib
Papermate blue ballpoint
Pentel Hi-Tec-C Slim Knock
Pentel Sigma Sign pen
Prismacolor Fine Marker
Robert Simmons 785 white sable brushes
Rotring fountain pen
Rotring Isograph
Sanford Design Ebony pencil
Sanford Expresso Extra Fine
Sanford Expresso Extra Fine
Speedball A-5 nib
Tachikawa "G"
Tombow GCD - 11 brush pen
Tri-Art markers
Uni Pin Fine Line
Uni Posca Paint pens
Uni-ball Roller
Uni-ball Vision
Winsor Newton Graphic Series 239 brush
Zebra G



Later this week comedy writer, producer and cartoonist Tom Gammill provides his answers to the Cartoonist Survey.

Thursday, May 5, 2011

Jorge Pacheco - Cartoonist Survey #223




Born in May of 1964, cartoonist, comic book artist, and illustrator Jorge Pacheco has been drawing since the age of 2. He is a graduate of the Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphic Arts and has been drawing professionally for 25 years. He has worked on some of the most famous characters including Space Ghost, Bullwinkle, Underdog, Johnny Quest, Garfield, Scooby Doo, The Flintstones, Power Puff Girls and Bugs Bunny. His client list contains many of the leading cartoon and comic book publishing companies such as Dark Horse, DC, Hanna Barbera, Cracked magazine, Archie, Warner Brothers and Harvey Entertainment where he worked with my friend Bill White (Cartoonist Survey #1). Jorge has also illustrated many children’s books and was the artist for the syndicated comic strip, CEO DAD. He lives in La Mesa, CA with his wife Sabine and their son J.J. See more of Jorge’s work over at his Pachecotoons website.

What is your favorite pen to use?

I don't use a pen as much as a brush. I use a Winsor Newton series 7 #2. I do use Micron pens for straight lines and some detail work.

Do you draw in pencil first and if so do you use a standard pencil or a mechanical one?

Standard Staedtler Mars HB.

Do you do your coloring by hand or on the computer?

Both. Watercolor, acrylics, dyes, colored pencils, gouache, and whatever is handy. But probably 80% by computer.

What type of paper do you use?

Strathmore Bristol smooth 11x17.

What thing(s) do you hate to draw?

No such thing, but I used to hate drawing cars, but now I'd love to do an illustration a la "Big Daddy Roth."

Do you buy your supplies from big chain art store catalogues/websites or a local one that you physically go to?

Dick Blick's Art Supply Store, both on-line and physically at the store in San Diego.

Are there any rituals that you do before starting to draw?

Yes, I try to entertain my 3 1/2 year old son, so I can find a few minutes to get work done. I'm a work-from-home daddy. I work crazy hours: early, late, weekends.

Do you listen to music while you draw and if so what genre?

I listen to lots of talk radio, but I also listen "New Wave 80's rock" REM, The Smiths are my two favorites, but I enjoy all music, except RAP :(

Did you read comics as a kid and if so what was your favorite?

YES! Quick story on how I got into it: My step-father owned a liquor/convenience store and he brought home damaged comics and magazines. The first comic I read was Jack Kirby's Fin-Fang-Foom comic with Steve Ditko and a Superman comic by Curt Swan also Creepy, Eerie, Vampirella. My favorite was Richard Corben. He's still doing incredible work.

What is or was your favorite comic strip?

That's a hard one. So many genres. I love Prince Valiant by Hal Foster, just beautiful work. Krazy Kat, but modern day, of course, Peanuts. I think Charles Schulz was the greatest cartoonist ever. Jack Kirby for comics.

What was your favorite book as a child and do you still own a copy of it?

Unfortunately, I lost over 3,000 comics in the fire of 2003 in San Diego, but yes, the Jack Kirby Fin-Fang-Foom. Now when I have a few extra $$$s, I buy graphic novels or collections of my past favorites.

Did you have any formal art training and if so where did you receive it?

The Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphics

Do you feel that the Internet is a blessing or a curse?

BLESSING!!! Most of my work I receive is through the Internet. I just did a handful of illustrations for a guy in Singapore, a children's book for a client on the Bahamas, and book illustrations for someone in Australia.

Did either of your parents draw?

YES! My father was Professor of Art at Purdue University before he passed away. I never really knew him, but it's funny that I became an artist. My mother was an Art Minor in college.

Who in your life is/was the most supportive of your art?

Definitely my wife Sabine!! She not only has always been there for me through financial struggles, but she also encourages me to continue my dream of being an artist, and, of course, she has always been my biggest fan. :)

Do you keep a sketchbook?

I've never been a real "sketcher", but I wish I would find time to sketch.

Have you ever taught cartooning/drawing and if so did you enjoy the experience?

Yes. At UCLA - I taught a basic cartooning class and also a couple elementary school classes/kids 6-10 years old, and I really enjoyed it!

Do you feel that talent or passion is more important in drawing?

Passion without a doubt. It can be such a tough road that without the passion I could have never kept it going, but needless to say there has to be talent mixed in.

Do you collect anything and if so what?

I still buy comics/graphic novels when I'm not buying diapers. :)

If you were an animated cartoon character who do you think you would be?

Popeye, but maybe a little Speed Racer also. (Even though I neve speed but I do eat spinach)

Are you a righty or lefty?

Righty

If you weren't an artist what would you want to do for work?

Professional Tennis player.

In one or two sentences describe your drawing area.

We currently live in a small cottage in La Mesa - unfortunately, I have to spread out a bit - my light/drawing table is in the bedroom and my computer/work station/wacom tablet are in the living room. Hoping to "upgrade" soon and have my own studio again.

Do you play any musical instruments?

Wish I did, especially guitar.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone who wants to pursue drawing as a career what would it be?

Never give up!

Who is your favorite artist?

Very tough question: Here is a brief list: Jack Kirby, Chris Bachalo, Hal Foster, Richard Corben, John Romita JR., Charles Schulz, John Buscema, Milton Caniff, Alex Toth, Jaime Hernandez, Jordi Bernet, John Byrne, Thomas Yeates, but there are so many more, but if I have to name one, it would be Vincet Van Gogh, go figure!

Thanks again for your time Jorge!

Monday, May 2, 2011

I Did Not Know That!

As Johnny Carson used to say, "I did not know that"...you could do this.

Check out this great money-saving tip from cartoonist Adam Koford.


Adam "Ape Lad" Koford is the creator of the cartoon "Laugh-Out-Loud-Cats". Check out the "Laugh-Out-Loud-Cats" at Adam's HOBOTOPIA blog.

A hat tip to Drawn!

Sunday, May 1, 2011

Eric Orchard - Cartoonist Survey #222





Award winning illustrator and cartoonist Eric Orchard grew up in Halifax, Nova Scotia. He started on the path to becoming a professional artist in grade school where he began illustrating stories. He studied painting and art history at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design and graduated with a BFA. Eric has illustrated three children’s books. His first, “A Forest for Christmas” was published in September of 2007. The second and third, “Anything but Hank” and “The Terrible, Horrible Smelly Pirate” were published a year later. In 2010 his work was showcased at The Society of Illustrators annual exhibit. The same year he was awarded silver in the comics category of The Spectrum Awards, and his work was featured in Spectrum 17: The Best of Contemporary Fantastic Art. Eric's winning page for the Spectrum Awards comes from his mini-comic The Cloud Cave, which he is currently expanding and adapting into a full-length graphic novel, “Maddy Kettle (Book 1): The Adventures of the Thimblewitch.” Top Shelf Productions will be releasing “Maddy Kettle” in the near future.

Robot Museum is another comic project Eric has been working on and it is science fiction themed and filled with monsters and robots. He has been working on Robot Museum for the last five years and plans to self-publish it in a series of three or four books. Some of his clients include Scholastic, Discovery Channel, Raincoat Books, Orca Books, Tor Books, Nimbus Publishing and Five Rivers Publishing. Eric lives with his wife Julie and their son Henry in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Visit both his website and his blog to see much more of his work and you can purchase some of his mini-comics here.

What is your favorite pen to use?

I use a Pigma Micron marker pen by Sakura mostly, because it's convenient and holds up really well over time. But my favorite pen is probably a Hunt 102 nib dip pen.

Do you draw in pencil first and if so do you use a standard pencil or a mechanical one?

I do draw in pencil first. I use a Staedtler standard pencil, 2B.

Do you do your coloring by hand or on the computer?

I go back and forth although I’m colouring by computer more and more

If you do your coloring by hand, what do you use?

When I colour by hand I use Winsor Newton watercolours and gouache.

What type of paper do you use?

I use a variety of papers. I like a 4 ply Strathmore paper for most stuff but if I’m going to paint I'll use Arches hot press watercolour paper 140 pounds.

What thing(s) do you hate to draw?

Bicycles.

Do you buy your supplies from big chain art store catalogues/websites or a local one that you physically go to?

A local shop. I almost always find something I need not on my list.

Are there any rituals that you do before starting to draw?

Not really, I just jump right in.

Do you listen to music while you draw and if so what genre?

I like to have on very quiet Classical music, Bach or some late romantic stuff.

Did you read comics as a kid and if so what was your favorite?

I did. I loved all sorts of comics. Marvel's Star Wars, Omega Men, Bloom County, Peanuts, Atari Force, Carl Barks, EC horror reprints, Tintin, Amethyst, Rocket Raccoon, Claremont's X-Men and a number of Marvel and DC superhero comics.

What is or was your favorite comic strip?

Krazy Kat.

What was your favorite book as a child and do you still own a copy of it?

Probably “The Celery Stalks at Midnight” by James Howe and yes, I still have a copy

Did you have any formal art training and if so where did you receive it?

I started art lessons in junior high with a police portrait artist and later received a Bachelors in Fine Arts from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design.

Do you feel that the Internet is a blessing or a curse?

Both! It allows me to reach more people but at the same time it's becoming a form of entertainment that takes eyes away from creators.

Did either of your parents draw?

I never met my father but according to my mother he drew all the time.

Who in your life is/was the most supportive of your art?

My mother and now my wife as well.

Do you keep a sketchbook?

Yes, I go through about one a month. Very important part of my process.

Have you ever taught cartooning/drawing and if so did you enjoy the experience?

I taught art at the high school level for two years and found it both fun and stressful. More stressful.

Do you feel that talent or passion is more important in drawing?

Passion will carry you farther, I think.

Do you collect anything and if so what?

Books, mostly books with pictures; comics, picture books, illustrated books etc.

If you were an animated cartoon character who do you think you would be?

The Iron Giant

Are you a righty or lefty?

Righty.

If you weren't an artist what would you want to do for work?

I'm not good at anything else. Maybe something academic, with lots of books.

In one or two sentences describe your drawing area.

Tiny chaos.


Do you play any musical instruments?

No.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone who wants to pursue drawing as a career what would it be?

Persistence is way more important than I ever would have guessed.

Who is your favorite artist?

Arthur Rackham and Quentin Blake. I can't decide!



Thanks again Eric.